The Struggle for Autistic Children to Get an Education Should Not Happen

The Scotsman, September 26, 2018 | Go to article overview

The Struggle for Autistic Children to Get an Education Should Not Happen


Research has been conducted by Children in Scotland, the National Autistic Society Scotland and Scottish Autism into the experiences of autistic children missing school.

More than a third of parents (34 per cent) who responded to the survey reported that their children had been unlawfully excluded in the last two years - with almost a quarter (22 per cent) saying this happened multiple times a week.

An exclusion is unlawful when a school sends a child home without using the formal process. Scottish Government guidance is clear that unlawful exclusions should not happen. But they do. I've spent the last year fighting for my son's education.

Calum is 12 and in first year in an autism unit in a mainstream high school. Things are going really well so far. He enjoys the different subjects and one science teacher has made a particular impression with his fascinating experiments.

It is a relief to see Calum enjoying school. He is a bright and capable boy with a high IQ, but he struggles with noisy environments and fine motor skills. This frustrates him more as he gets older and notices his peers can do things he can't.

I just remind him that he can answer the questions on Only Connect that most adults find impossible!

Before starting high school, Calum attended an autism unit in a mainstream primary. This went really well at first and he came home each day with his head up, shoulders down and full of chat. But after a while there were staffing changes that Calum found stressful. He started breaking his glasses, a coping tactic he'd developed years before.

This was when the fight really began. In October 2017 Calum received his first unlawful exclusion.

He was just 11. My husband and I were actually in the school at the time for a meeting about Calum's transition to high school. My husband was suddenly asked to go to the classroom because Calum was having a meltdown and the teacher needed help. We were asked to take him home immediately.

Things spiralled from there and between November and December 2017 Calum had four unlawful exclusions, culminating with a formal exclusion on 11 December. I felt this was unfair and I didn't want it on his record, so I contacted the National Autistic Society Scotland.

The charity works with legal firm Harper MacLeod to provide free legal advice around education rights. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Struggle for Autistic Children to Get an Education Should Not Happen
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.