NYC STUDENTS' BOOKS HONORED by the New York City Department of Education and the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, June/July 2017 | Go to article overview

NYC STUDENTS' BOOKS HONORED by the New York City Department of Education and the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation


YOUNG AUTHORS WIN 31ST ANNUAL BOOKMAKING COMPETITION

NEW YORK-The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation, in partnership with the New York City Department of Education, announced the winners of the 31st annual Ezra Jack Keats Bookmaking Competition for grades 3-12.

In addition to the city-wide and borough winners and honorable mention recipients being given medals at an awards ceremony, the citywide winners received $500, and the borough winners, $100. Each team of educators who assisted the winners also received an award-a gift certificate for their choice of 15 children's books contributed by Keats' publisher, Penguin Random House.

"Some of the city's most talented young writers and illustrators have worked hard to bring their creative ideas to life through the making of a book," said Deborah Pope, executive director of the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation. "It was at public school that Ezra first received recognition for his talent, inspiring him to pursue his dreams. Our hope is that this award will inspire these young people as well."

The Ezra Jack Keats Bookmaking Competition is divided into three categories: elementary (grades 3-5), middle school (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12).

CITY-WIDE WINNERS

Grades 3-5:

"The Story of the Mirabal Sisters," by Amber Siurano (Grade 4)

P.S. 63, Old South School, Ozone Park, Queens

Maria Panotopoulou, Teacher; Kathleen Fleischmann-Cavanaugh, Librarian; Diane Marino, Principal

The winner says: "History is my passion, and I decided to write about the inspiring Mirabal sisters. Like my great-grandfather, the three sisters stood up and fought against the Trujillo dictatorship in the Dominican Republic. I chose not to add facial features to the sisters; I felt they could represent anyone who acted as they did. I did not draw mouths on the people's faces, only eyes, because at the time people could only observe and not speak against the cruelty of Trujillo. …

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