Democrats Urge Trump to Launch FBI Investigation into Kavanaugh Sexual Assault Allegation

By Donachie, Robert | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, September 20, 2018 | Go to article overview

Democrats Urge Trump to Launch FBI Investigation into Kavanaugh Sexual Assault Allegation


Donachie, Robert, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Eight Senate Democrats sent a letter to President Trump Thursday afternoon urging him to launch an FBI investigation into an allegation that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted a young woman in the 1980s.

The group of senators, consisting of former prosecutors and attorneys general, is requesting that the Trump administration open an FBI investigation into the allegations before the Senate moves forward with Kavanaugh's confirmation process. The group comprised Sens. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Doug Jones, D-Ala., Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Catherine Cortez-Mastro, D-Nev.

"As former prosecutors and attorneys general, we write to express our deep concern that your Administration has reportedly refused to direct the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to reopen its background investigation to conduct appropriate follow-up in response to the allegations that have been raised against Judge Brett Kavanaugh," the senators wrote.

The senators are addressing allegations raised by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who told the Washington Post on the record Sunday about an alleged incident between herself and Kavanaugh during a high school party in the early 1980s. Ford claimed Kavanaugh held her on her back on a bed during a house party in Maryland. She accused Kavanaugh of groping her, trying to undress her and suppressing her mouth with his hand. She said she was able to escape only after a friend interrupted them.

Ford claims there was at least one witness present in the room and a total of four people at the party. One of the witnesses, Mark Judge, who Ford identifies as the witness in the room, claims he was both not in the room during the alleged incident and he has never seen Kavanaugh act in the manner Ford describes. Another of the proposed witnesses, who was identified by Ford as being present party, also denies any knowledge of the party in question or any inappropriate conduct by Kavanaugh.

Ford's story immediately caused Democrats and some Republican senators to call for an investigation, or public testimony from both Ford and Kavanaugh, before having a final vote on his confirmation.

Kavanaugh, who has called Ford's allegations patently false, has agreed to testify before the committee and answer any questions the senators might have. Republican Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley's staff has repeatedly reached out to Ford, but she has yet to confirm whether or not she plans to testify.

There is a scheduled public hearing Monday to discuss the allegations. Ford has until 10 a.m. Friday to agree to publicly testify, following committee rules. The committee is expected to cancel the hearing Monday if Ford does not respond by the deadline.

Ford's attorneys, along with Senate Democrats, are insisting that a full FBI investigation must come before both or either party testifies before the Senate — a point repeated in Thursday's letter to the president.

"The allegations now before us include a number of issues that would ordinarily be addressed by law enforcement. One of these is the fact that the allegations mention multiple witnesses who may have relevant information to share in an interview. Another is that there are reports of medical evidence and a polygraph test, which should be reviewed," the senators wrote. "These are tasks that are properly done by law enforcement professionals and that are consistent with the FBI’s work in conducting background checks of other nominees. In this instance, the need for this type of follow-up is all the more important in light of the fact that two of the people who may have relevant information have already sent letters stating their refusal to appear before the Judiciary Committee. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Democrats Urge Trump to Launch FBI Investigation into Kavanaugh Sexual Assault Allegation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.