Political Leadership in Nigeria: Our National Anthem and National Pledge

By Mohammed, Dr Iliyasu Biu; Ayeni, Evans Oluwagbamila | The Journal of Pan African Studies (Online), September 2018 | Go to article overview

Political Leadership in Nigeria: Our National Anthem and National Pledge


Mohammed, Dr Iliyasu Biu, Ayeni, Evans Oluwagbamila, The Journal of Pan African Studies (Online)


Introduction

Nigeria is a post-colonial political independent entity that has desired and striven for unity, peace, justice, self-reliance and multi-dimensional development and progress. This is expressed in her national anthem and national pledge. The country has embarked on several national development plans and public polices in the quest to achieve her dreams and aspiration since independence in 1960 till date. The second National development plan (1970-1974) outlined the following objectives: A united strong and self-reliant nation; a great and dynamic economy; a just and egalitarian society; a free and democratic society; and a land of bright and full opportunities for all citizens (National Planning Office, 1975). All these laudable dreams, visions and objectives embedded in Nigeria's National Anthem and National Pledge have all worked in reversed order most times. The colonial imperialism of subjugation, enslavement and open plunder of our human and natural resources laterally compares to the underdevelopment bedeviling Nigeria since 1960 political independence with "Africans under developing Africans" rather than European underdevelopment of Africa. Soludo (2006:8) notes that about 17 million Nigerians live abroad struggling to earn a living as Walter Rodney posits. The Nigeria state has had competing demands seen in the Niger-Delta crisis, State-Local government administration, citizenship-identity-minority questions, Islamic insurgency and pastoral-cattle-farmers violence amongst other variables in the matrix of development.

Indeed, tracing the nature and causes of the depth of underdevelopment within the facets of the Nigerian society is an uphill task given the easy manipulations of visible and invisible forces of divisiveness and disintegration at work. The first attempt by civilian elected government to rule in 1960 revealed the inherent weaknesses in our political ideology and value system, which was easily eroded by personal, ethnic, geographical, religious and narrow socio-economic interests and the inheritance of the colonial (non-African) model of governance (and other forms of neo-colonialism). This was exacerbated further by Nigeria's military overthrow antecedent often done on the basis of awful conditions and corruption (Dawood, 2014:292). The issue of multi-facet corruption was so alarming in the 1960s that the military was leftwith no option than to remove the democratically elected leaders of Nigeria's 1st Republic from power.

The failure to tackle this menace has continued haunting us at all points to the path of great nation-states. Olusegun Obasanjo (1994) before his 'second coming' in a keynote address on Nigeria, the state of the Nation and the way forward" organized by Arewa House Kaduna quoted a foreign writer to amplify our condition thus:

Once Nigeria was considered the anchor and bellwether of a huge continent, blessed with clever and energetic peoples, favored with ample material resources (especially oil), and is Africa most populous country. But despite size and wealth, Nigeria lingers in the doldrums, perpetually a country of the future.

It is pertinent to note that, the mismanagement of resources coupled with the political instability in Nigeria which saw military intervention five times successfully and spanning 29 years showed offits multiplier effect on the long years of decline in the economic and social wellbeing of the majority of Nigerians. The foregoing is in contradiction to the Nigerian National Anthem which says, 'To serve our fatherland' and the oath taken by political leaders to that effect.

The challenges before past, present and future Nigerian political leadership is examined in this paper within a cross examination of two national symbols, the National Anthem and the national pledge. In order to explore the way forward, the paper attempted to clarify some of the concepts used and useful comments made so as to enhance our understanding. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Political Leadership in Nigeria: Our National Anthem and National Pledge
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.