Portman Natalie


NATALIE PORTMAN MADE HEADLINES WHEN SHE called out the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn, onstage at the 2018 Golden Globes for nominating an all-male lineup in the best director category. The awards bypassed eligible contenders such as Greta Gerwig and Dee Rees.

Flanked by America Ferrera and social justice activists, Portman also used the show's red carpet as a platform for protest on behalf of the Time's Up movement: The carpet was transformed into a sea of black gowns in a show of solidarity with sexual-harassment survivors.

Time's Up was founded on Jan. 1, just days before the Golden Globes. Nine months later, the anti-sexual-harassment group's legal defense fund has raised more than $22 million and helped more than 34,000 women across a range of professions.

"I had been feeling, of course, very upset about all of the allegations that were coming to light in our own industry and feeling like I wanted to do something, but not knowing what to do," Portman says. The Oscar winner, who was invited by her agent to participate in the group, joined a slew of A-listers working to prevent workplace harassment, including founding signatories Jennifer Aniston, Shonda Rhimes, Meryl Streep and Reese Witherspoon. Portman describes the first meeting as a collective feeling of women in the industry wanting to turn their anger into positive action. "Many of the people in the room had suffered these kinds of experiences."

Time's Up, which advocates for women in all industries - not just entertainment - in the battle against sexual harassment and assault, has been at the forefront of many #MeToo events this past year, including staging a national walkout to support Brett Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford and calling on CBS to fire Les Moonves without an exit package after more than a dozen women brought allegations of abuse against the media mogul. …

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