Today in Music History - Oct. 27

The Canadian Press, October 27, 2018 | Go to article overview

Today in Music History - Oct. 27


Today in Music History - Oct. 27

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Today in Music History for Oct. 27:

In 1782, Niccolo Paganini, the Italian violinist whose virtuosity became a legend, was born in Genoa. He died in 1840 of cancer of the larynx.

In 1917, a 16-year-old violin prodigy, Jascha Heifetz, made his American debut at New York's Carnegie Hall.

In 1923, Canadian musician, flautist, conductor and music educator Mario Duschenes was born in Altona, Germany. He moved to Canada in 1948 and settled in Montreal soon after. Heralded for the magical way he instilled musical aptitude and sensibility in children, he was an expert in the Orff method and developed and published an internationally recognized method of teaching the recorder. He also conducted extremely popular classical music concerts for young people with major symphony orchestras in Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa, and as far away as New Zealand. He died Jan. 31, 2009.

In 1928, Gilles Vigneault, one of Quebec's greatest chansonniers, was born in Natashquan on the North Shore. He's credited with revitalizing the Quebec chanson in the 1960s and with helping make Quebec culture known abroad. Vigneault's song "Mon Pays," first performed by Monique Leyrac in 1965 at an international song festival in Poland, became a virtual anthem for the Quebec independence movement. "Mon Pays" also helped make Vigneault one of the best-known Quebec performers outside his home province.

In 1933, country piano player Floyd Cramer was born in Shreveport, La. He is credited with inventing the slipnote style of piano playing which characterized the Nashville Sound that came to the fore in the early 1960s. He died in Nashville of cancer on Dec. 31, 1997.

In 1936, country music great Ernest Tubb made his first recordings -- "The Passing of Jimmie Rodgers" and "Jimmie Rodgers's Last Thoughts" -- for RCA. Rodgers, who was Tubb's hero, had died three years earlier.

In 1956, Clarence Henry's "Ain't Got No Home" was released. It was his first hit and the inspiration for his name "Frogman," since he sings like a frog on the record.

In 1958, Simon LeBon, lead singer of the British New Romantic band "Duran Duran," was born in Bushey, England. Helped by LeBon's pinup boy qualities, "Duran Duran" first hit the British charts in 1981 with the single "Planet Earth," scoring in North America the following year with "Hungry Like the Wolf." Other hits included "Union of the Snake," "The Reflex," "New Moon on Monday" and the theme from the James Bond movie "A View to a Kill." In the mid-1980s band members branched out as LeBon, Nick Rhodes and Roger Taylor formed "Arcadia" while Andy Taylor and John Taylor formed "Power Station" with Robert Palmer. The original band lineup reunited in 2001 but guitarist Andy Taylor left the band again in 2006. "Duran Duran" has sold more than 70 million albums.

In 1960, Ben E. King recorded "Spanish Harlem" and "Stand By Me" at Atlantic's New York studios. Songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller produced the session, assisted by Phil Spector. Both songs were top-10 hits in 1961, with "Stand By Me" enjoying a renaissance when it was used as the title song for the 1986 movie directed by Rob Reiner.

In 1964, the single "Come See About Me" by "The Supremes" was released.

In 1970, the rock opera "Jesus Christ, Superstar" was released in North America on an 87-minute double LP. The work, written by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, tells of the last seven days of Christ as seen through the eyes of children of the day. The cast included Ian Gillan of "Deep Purple," Murray Head and Yvonne Elliman. A Broadway production of "Jesus Christ, Superstar" opened a year after the album was released.

In 1975, Bruce Springsteen appeared on the covers of both "Time" and "Newsweek." His album "Born to Run" was on its way up the charts at the time.

In 1979, country singer Jimmie Skinner died of a heart attack at age 70. He had three top-10 hits in the 1950s -- "I Found My Girl in the USA," "What Makes a Man Wander" and "Dark Hollow. …

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