Trump Flunks History of 14th Amendment

By Times, Seattle | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), November 3, 2018 | Go to article overview

Trump Flunks History of 14th Amendment


Times, Seattle, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


Donald Trump needs a lesson in U.S. history. Starting with the fact that this nation's greatest leaders didn't divide Americans through labels and insults. They united us through their brilliance and moral integrity.

The president's latest volley on immigration calls into question whether he was paying attention in any of his history classes in high school or college that dealt with constitutional issues. Trump vowed Tuesday to sign an executive order that would seek to end the right to U.S. citizenship for children born in the United States to non-citizens.

It's a blatant effort to rally his base before the midterm elections. It also runs counter to the intent of the framers of the 14th Amendment, who addressed the issue in no uncertain terms. Prior to President Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, the question arose whether African-Americans born in the U.S. would be considered citizens.

Attorney General Edward Bates, who was regarded as the most conservative member of Lincoln's "team of rivals" cabinet, was asked to address the issue.

"Our constitution, in speaking of natural born citizens, uses no affirmative language to make them such, but only recognizes and reaffirms the universal principle, common to all nations, and as old as political society, that the people born in a country do constitute the nation, and, as individuals, are natural members of the body politic," Bates wrote. "If this be a true principle, and I do not doubt it, it follows that every person born in a country is, at the moment of birth, prima facie a citizen."

If Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Neil Gorsuch are, as they have repeatedly claimed, originalists who believe that it's a moral imperative to get to the heart of the intent of the framers of the Constitution, then they should lead the effort on the court to declare any such Trump executive order unconstitutional. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Trump Flunks History of 14th Amendment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.