Trump's Criticism of France: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

By Rogan, Tom | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, November 13, 2018 | Go to article overview

Trump's Criticism of France: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly


Rogan, Tom, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


President Trump's Twitter storm criticisms against France on Tuesday are a tale of the good, the bad, and the ugly. Let's take each identifier in turn.

On the good side of things, Trump is right to challenge the European narrative of an internationalism that exists separate from the United States. This narrative is utterly problematic for both European security interests or broader NATO security.

While Trump's language might seem harsh, it reflects a justifiable American aggravation at the broader manner by which top European Union states tend to regard the U.S. as a piggy bank for their security interests. It is also manifestly true that Europe is free thanks to American military power. And NATO's strength certainly depends on the common investment of its various members, and not just the United States. While France has taken positive steps in this regard, Germany and numerous other European nations continue to treat their defense ministries as a complete joke. Trump is right to call out these realities.

Unfortunately, Trump was quick to unleash the bad tweets shortly thereafter. That occurred when Trump suggested that the U.S. should introduce new tariffs on French wine imports.

It's certainly true that France creates restrictive barriers to entry on American wine imports, but a tariff would be bad news for Americans. After all, many of us at the middle income level enjoy an occasional glass or two of Chablis or Pomerol. But while more wealthy Americans would be able to afford any new tariff on French wines, the rest of us would suffer in spending inordinately more to fulfill our constitutional and divine right to the pursuit of happiness! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Trump's Criticism of France: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.