A Food Fan's Tour of the Emerald Isle

By Yarwood, Sam | Manchester Evening News, December 3, 2018 | Go to article overview

A Food Fan's Tour of the Emerald Isle


Yarwood, Sam, Manchester Evening News


tr avel report IRELAND WHAT'S the first thing that comes mind when you hear the word Ireland? Leprechauns? Guinness? Jamesons? Quite often this would be the case.

Ireland is extremely well-known across the globe for its mythological creatures and liquid exports, but there is so much more waiting to be discovered on that piece of land between here and the US.

Hidden in the bustling streets of Dublin is a wealth of culinary delights - from delicious fine dining to tasty street food - as well as a rich history and of course plenty of opportunities to shop.

For those who prefer a quieter scene, then Cork offers just that. A huge market hall to explore, a river to walk along and even the chance to sample an array of craft beers brewed on the site of an old Franciscan monastery.

There's so much for food fans to do, see and taste, and let's be honest, who doesn't love food? Here's just a few things all foodies need to do when in Ireland...

Go on a tasting tour FAB Food Trails are not only a brilliant way to explore the side streets of Dublin, but they also give you an insight into the culinary delights the city has to offer.

The tour features an array of independently-owned businesses that showcase both the traditional and contemporary Irish table.

It can include the likes of Sheridan's Cheesemongers - a MUST for cheese lovers - as well as Klaw in Temple Bar, which brings "the taste of the seas into the city" and is the go-to place for all things crab, and also the Dublin Pizza Company, an establishment so small you may miss it, as it's literally just a hole in the wall with a pizza oven. Despite its tiny appearance however, the pizza fantastic, and, what's more, it's open till 3am at weekends.

? For more visit www.fabfoodtrails.ie.

Enjoy Afternoon Tea at The Westbury SITUATED right in the heart of Grafton Street, this family-run hotel is the perfect place to stop and relax after a hard day of shopping in Dublin.

The Gallery, or the "drawing room of Dublin" as it is known to some, overlooks the busy city streets, and is popular with not only visitors, but also local politicians, business men and women, and groups of friends enjoying a catch up over a huge selection of tea and even more edible delights.

It is also home to €1m of Irish art, and can easily take the title of Dublin's most stylish hotel, so why stop at just popping in for Afternoon Tea? It may be a bit pricier than a budget hotel, but it is also home to one of the city's top restaurants, the award-winning Gatsby-inspired Wilde, as well as the equally delicious Balfes Bar and Brasserie, and for anyone who loves an after dinner tipple - The Sidecar cocktail bar.

? For more visit www.doylecollection.com/hotels/the-westbury-hotel.

Visit The Little Museum of Dublin I realise we are moving away from food, but don't worry. It's just for a moment.

Rated the best museum in Dublin on Trip Advisor, The Little Museum of Dublin tells the story of the Irish capital in a quick, fun and entertaining way.

It gives guests the chance to explore the city's fascinating history, and the people and events that shaped it into the place it is today.

There's an exhibition on Women's History, an even one on rock band U2, featuring musical rarities, signed albums and some great photography.

It really is what it says on the tin, a little museum, dedicated to Dublin.

Oh, and after you should nip across the road to St Stephen's Green, but you'll find out more about that on the tour. …

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