The International Byron Societies 2018

The Byron Journal, July 1, 2018 | Go to article overview

The International Byron Societies 2018


BYRON SOCIETY OF AMERICA

In January, the BSA sponsored its 45 th annual session the Modern Language Association Convention in New York City. Entitled 'Byron and Politics', this panel was convened by Jack Wasserman (independent scholar and longstanding board member), and featured talks by Piya Pal-Lipinski (Bowling Green), Jonathan Gross (DePaul), and Andrew Warren (Harvard). Next year, at the MLA in Chicago in January, our session will be a bicentennial one, '1819 in 2019'. Jonathan Sachs (Concordia) will preside over a roundtable discussion of the relevance of 1819 for our contemporary moment, where 1819 refers both to the events of that year and to James Chandler's foundational work, England in 1819. Speakers will be Ian Duncan (Berkeley), Amanda Jo Goldstein (Berkeley), Deidre Lynch (Harvard), Josephine McDonagh (Chicago), and Jerome McGann (Virginia). James Chandler (Chicago) will give a response.

In May, the BSA co-sponsored the annual Romantic Bicentennials Stuart Curran Symposium with the Keats-Shelley Association, entitled 'Frankenstein Then and Now, 1818-2018.' Organised by Jerry H ogle and Anne M ellor, and held at the Huntington Library and co-sponsored by them as well with support from Cal Tech, the conference brought together a wide range of programming and a big, diverse audience. About 200 people all told came to events, and the Huntington Library did a wonderful job of hosting in one of the most beautiful spots in southern California.

One innovative aspect of this conference was its movement beyond literary-critical papers. First, the conference was bookended by talks from world-renowned genetic scientists (David Baltimore at Cal Tech and Jennifer Doudna at Berkeley) and legal experts (Hank Greeley from Stanford) on the creation and editing of life in the lab, all in reference to the ideas in Mary Shelley's novel. Second, we watched a special screening of the National Theatre production of Frankenstein (with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller), and then heard from playwright Nick Dear on how he went about adapting the novel. This was all in addition to excellent papers by Anne Mellor, Alan Richardson, Gillen D'Arcy Wood, and others.

Plans are being made for next year's Romantic Bicentennials Curran Symposium in celebration of Don Juan. Jonathan Gross is organising a series of lectures and performances to be held 18 and 19 October, 2019 in Chicago, at DePaul University and the Chicago Historical Society. More information will be posted when available at the Romantic Bicentennials website (http://romantics200.org) and the BSA site (http://byronsociety.org).

The Society awarded Student Travel Grants of $1,000 each to Stephen Webb (to attend the IABS Conference in Ravenna) and Daniel Kennedy (to attend the Student Byron Conference in Messolonghi).

In 2018, we also welcomed two new members to our Board of Directors: John Spaulding Gatton and Ghislaine McDayter. In addition, Kaila Rose began working as our social media coordinator. We look forward to working with them to promote the study of the works, life, and cultural impact of Byron in the United States and around the world.

Andrew Stauffer

President

FRENCH BYRON SOCIETY

After the very intense 2016 year, the French Byron Society had a quieter 2017, during which its members met twice, once in June for the AGM and once in October.

Daniele Sarrat presented '"Such immortal fire": the interest for Byron and his works expressed by the French romantic painters from 1819 to 1863.' Based on the lists of all paintings displayed at the Paris Salons during the period running from Byron's first translation into French until Eugene Delacroix's death, she showed that numerous painters who were inspired by scenes from Byron's poems and illustrated them, are still to be rediscovered. During these two meetings, Daniele Sarrat read the beginning of her newly undertaken rhythmic translation of The Bride of Abydos. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The International Byron Societies 2018
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.