Report on the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference

By Story, Amber L. | AI Magazine, Winter 2018 | Go to article overview

Report on the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference


Story, Amber L., AI Magazine


The Technology, Mind, and Society1 conference organized by the American Psychological Association (APA) was held in Washington, DC, April 5-7, 2018. APA welcomed scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and students from around the world to the conference, held in cooperation with the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group in Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI), the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES).

The Technology, Mind, and Society conference provided an interdisciplinary venue for reporting and assessing current efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology, for identifying priorities for future work, and for promoting exchange and collaboration among participants. The conference was organized around four broad themes: basic research. foundations of technology design, applications, and broader implications.

The theme included topics such as the ways in which humans understand and use technology, impacts of technology on human experience and behavior, human-technology interactions as mutually adaptive systems, and the role of technology in advancing other areas of scientific research. The foundations of technology design theme concerned with the development of technologies informed by psychological, behavioral, and social science research. The applications theme involved the development, use, and impact of specific technologies in domains such as aging, education, mental and physical health, recreation, and the workplace. Finally, broader implications addressed ethical, legal, and policy questions concerning the opportunities and challenges arising from human-technology interactions.

Main Conference

The two-and-a-half-day conference incorporated an impressive collection of symposia, papers, and posters, as well as keynote presentations, all focused on discoveries at the intersection of humans and technology. Four concurrent sessions across the two full days of the conference featured presentations on topics such as educational technology; cybersecurity; human-robot interactions; health, well-being, and technology; technology use and its effects across the lifespan; trust and control; technological design; and perception and cognition. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Report on the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.