2019: Featured Speakers

Texas Library Journal, Winter 2018 | Go to article overview

2019: Featured Speakers


Director's Symposium

Stephanie Ham serves as the director of Library Services for Metro Nashville Public Schools, where she oversees 130 school library programs and librarians across Music City. Before becoming the director, she was a middle school teacher and high school librarian, and served as the project coordinator of Limitless Libraries, a partnership program between Metro Nashville Public Schools and Nashville Public Library.

Mary Anne Hodel has been director and CEO of the Orange County Library System (FL) since January 2002. Under her leadership, the system has won numerous awards, including the 2011 American Library Association Library of the Future Award and the 2010 Florida Library of the Year, as well as numerous Downtown Development Golden Bricks. OCLS is a recognized leader in technology, and was the first public library in the nation to incorporate audio, video, photography, simulation, graphic arts, and maker faire instruction and labs into library service at the Dorothy Lumley Melrose Center for Technology, Innovation and Creativity.

Julius Jefferson is a section head in the Congressional Research Service at the Library of Congress and a 2020-2021 candidate for ALA President. He currently serves on and has been a member of the ALA Council since 2011, and most recently completed a 3-year term on the ALA Executive Board (2015-18). Jefferson has held a seat on the board of the Freedom to Read Foundation (2012-16) serving as the 2013-16 president; served as president of the District of Columbia Library Association (DCLA)(2015); and served on the board of the BCALA (2007-09). He is co- editor of The 21st-Century Black Librarian in America: Issues and Challenges and is often sought as a speaker on library-related issues such as diversity, leadership and professional development.

Maureen Sullivan, owner of Maureen Sullivan Associates, is an organizational development consultant to libraries and other information organizations. She has extensive experience on organizational development, strategic planning, leadership development, introducing and managing organizational change, organization and work redesign, establishment of staff development and learning programs for today's workplace, revision of position classification and compensation systems, and the identification and development of competencies. Sullivan is currently on the faculty of the annual ACRL/Harvard Leadership Institute and is a professor of practice in the new Ph.D./Managerial Leadership in the Information Professions program at the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science.

Richard Byrne is the president of Byrne Instructional Media, LLC. which manages multiple websites and training programs for teachers. A former high school social studies teacher best known for developing the award-winning blog Free Technology for Teachers which reaches more than 100,000 educators, Byrne's work is focused on sharing free resources that educators can use to enhance their students' learning experiences. He is a five time winner of the Edublogs Award for Best Resource Sharing Blog and is a Google Certified Teacher.

Colleen Dilenschneider, the chief market engagement officer at IMPACTS Research & Development, uses data to help cultural organizations maintain their relevance and secure their long-term financial futures. She is the author and publisher of the popular website Know Your Own Bone, a databased resource for cultural executives that has been prominently featured in several national publications, and is required reading for numerous graduate programs and professional conferences.

Ryan Dowd has woiked most of his I career in homeless shelters and currently I is executive director of the second largest homeless shelter in Illinois. He trains libraries around the country (and world) on how to work with difficult homeless patrons, using the same tools that homeless shelters employ. Dowd is the author of the ALA book, The Librarian's Guide to Homelessness. …

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