From Social Secretaries to HR Managers: An Analysis of Research on Women in Human Resource Management

By Appleby, Kaitlin | Management Revue, October 1, 2018 | Go to article overview

From Social Secretaries to HR Managers: An Analysis of Research on Women in Human Resource Management


Appleby, Kaitlin, Management Revue


Articles in the field of humsn res-usa- managcmrnt (s- HRM) fave taken noting (if the large representatioe (íS women working in )hg facusation (?o?o?, raie- ??-1 according to Ulrich,Yosngfc Brfenbank(avd Ulrich (2013), women account for about 62 percent of HRM employees worldwide. Due to being one of the few management functions tgat κ dominated by women, rmgrnual receurth on H?M at s career for women (s m-rsa-mSy sommlin, However thk eecearsa lomencmí-d mainly on comparing the salaries, roles, and career opportunities of women and men in the field, and neglec-s ghcari-Ung why fimitarieCes -r giaUei*nncerbetweent:hv sexes are observed. Although these studies are insightful for detailing whether HRM is considered a "good" or "bad" occupati o nfor women, the theoretical Dosumptions they are based on concerning the operation of gender in organizations lead to deadend outcomes that see little prospect for change both in women's career opportunities in HRM and the status of the occupation. These assumptions limit our understanding of how inequality is produced and maintained in the field as well as in organizations more broadly.

More specifically, the existing empirical studies on women in HRM view organizations as gender neutral and omit the historic gender hierarchy that impacts the div' ision of labor and distribiutionofrewmps inorAbnizbtions (Ackeb, P9P0; Legge, 1987). By neglecting organizations and organizational-level theorizing, these studies fail to take organizations' bole (n j^roduch^ and maintaining inaquahty wiAin foa occupation (Calas, Smicdnh, & Hqlvme>,20p4; StambucH Tomafowfo-Devey, et Skaggs, 2010) and in eonirdeuniq' nn s perceptint vaHRM su a ^siplierdl funcfioc (Hammonds, 2005; Mendy 2012). Aliernatively, feminint providas a foundational theoretical framework for comprehending wh° rneqselity peeaista aH what consequences gender het t)9 not ev;)t infonM uah' clotuc but aho die staiun of segregated occupations. By mcorpoescidg a fennmct ^PCIoeetivP1 n°s umqan impaf ow women's historically highee^bdentotiscm HRM nn dtasduteuoffoe qoldichigflighted. The effects of d-ia imqaci ado wnat p?? HRM oqat from dfluep manavemeAt occupations such as accoundng triar hvpe sady re c??-C? fennmzrcl (emplqyod mcreasing more women) and h avn lagaic nn arntnio ed prrfogr .Ha.nsU1 20 H0 .

So far, much of the HRM iiiafature has nfi inatrpondteV a dmieriti pro-pectinr when analyzing the fietdsw bríngtither anspro rteni titCvereote^n -onvisi evecaeer equality in management or as "traditionally the female ghetto of the corporate world" (Ridgeway, 20ql, °. 99). Inte^atin1 ?oc? con-tmation fommism dna specifically addresses inequality in trse ach nn women in HRM would allow studies totcasrcmdthe"uqoA"n'?acT duqofeond invertipaie forum pact of gender on indm-lualt en weU in on (fe HR oovfpation. Ad/htiot-l^, styanizational-level theoriev-v r vita1 fon ^??- (he rndivfoua1 r^i^t^cea>as, wliich hate nn far been the focus of ihe wvmm rn pO?9? htrrature. io tqa efruntueal foaurac 91 organizations that contributa to foe mamtrnancr v0 inequahty CAloesion ne d^inine^, 2009). I argue that taHng n gend carng oj^^rno^^ioDn- pev^eciine in darute would capture the co?p1eo?ac?°(a? Ir etween^nder, inequality, and the occupation, and provide an opportunity for HRM reseachers to understand the status of both those working in thefieldandthefield itself in a different way.

In this article, I review the emqiricae resta-ch nag women id HRM in vebcv to delecmine the theoretical astnmptivns tha underlie foe svitting iitrcaturo apcnf gander and its operation in the n-ldi Us-i-v dae Iont o:( cooiR constmctiog feminism, I illustrate how these assumptions ae problematic for studying HRM as an occupation for women. I then summaize the historical journey of women in HRM with the aim to show the enduring interrelation of gender, power, and the status of the field. Lastly, I outline a gendering organizations perspective for informing future reseach and suggest a reseach agenda that emphasizes organizations and the practices within them as locusts of inequality. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

From Social Secretaries to HR Managers: An Analysis of Research on Women in Human Resource Management
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.