Successful Aging: Doug McIntyre’s Retirement from Radio Raises Issues Familiar to Many Older Americans

By Dennis, Helen | Daily News (Los Angeles, CA), January 3, 2019 | Go to article overview

Successful Aging: Doug McIntyre’s Retirement from Radio Raises Issues Familiar to Many Older Americans


Dennis, Helen, Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)


Dear readers,

Doug McIntyre — a noted Southern California Newsgroup columnist, KABC 790 radio host, TV/film writer, producer and emcee — wrote on Dec. 23 of his retirement after 22 years from his “McIntyre in the Morning” radio show. He shared his struggle with that decision. McIntyre’s views are personal, realistic, inspiring and a societal statement.

He writes, “What’s hard is coming to grips with the word ‘retirement.’” “Even partial retirement means I have to face the dreaded ‘R’ word.” “Retirement is something old people do. I’m not old! Or am I?”

There is good reason to be ambivalent when it comes to retirement. Of course, that’s not everyone. Many are eager to retire, welcoming no commute, not having to adjust to another systems or management change and just ready for some freedom to do whatever you want to do, when you want to do it.

And yet many feel that uncertainty or strange feeling when we associate ourselves with retirement. That may be because an old image lingers on. At one time, the term was equated with old age, an older adult who is rigid, less capable, creative and productive than younger folks. Someone who is over the hill. These descriptors belong in the reject pile.

The term “retirement” comes from the French word “retirer” which means to withdraw. The contemporary definition is to not only withdraw, but to retreat, go away or to remove oneself. That’s not exactly a positive perspective on retirement.

Here are just two indications that the concept of retirement and aging is changing. Note retirement is intertwined with aging.

The Encore movement: This national movement was launched by Encore.org and its founder Marc Freedman 20 years ago. It is an innovation hub tapping the talent pool of those 50+ as a force for good. It promotes encore careers that embrace purpose, passion, a paycheck for the betterment of society; a Gen2Gen initiative to mobilize one million adults 50+ to help young people thrive as well as Encore Fellowships that engage seasoned professionals to paid assignments in the social sector. Encore.Org is building a global network that sees older adults as major contributors to society, solving social problems and contributing their talents, knowledge and wisdom to be a positive force in society, most frequently after their primary job or career. …

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