What's Wrong with Modern Politics?

The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), January 4, 2019 | Go to article overview

What's Wrong with Modern Politics?


So here we are at 2019. In the two years since Donald Trump's unexpected victory, everyone seems to have developed a strong theory about what's wrong with modern politics. It could be the economic decline of the white working class - or maybe, less charitably, the problem is the white working class' incorrigible racism. Others prefer to blame immigration, political correctness or simply the overweening arrogance of America's self-appointed mandarin class.

Proponents of these explanations can point to compelling evidence. But that evidence conceals the same fatal flaw in each story: the attempt to explain a novel phenomenon by way of some long-term factor that hasn't changed, or else to explain a global phenomenon in terms of some local peeve.

American racism, for example, is the left's favorite explanation for the rise of Trump. Columbia University sociologist Musa Al-Gharbi has pointed out a number of flaws in this thesis, the most glaring of which is that the United States has been racist for a long time and much more racist in the past than now - but now is when America elected Trump.

You might argue that it took a novel event to fan the embers of the nation's latent racism - something like, say, the presidency of Barack Obama.

But that argument only briefly satisfies, because Trumpish leaders seem increasingly popular throughout the world. Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines, Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, Viktor Orban in Hungary - it's hard to argue that all those voters, of different races, languages and cultures, were identically unnerved by the sight of Obama in the Oval Office.

In fact, it's hard to argue that any flavor of American identity politics can explain what has become a global phenomenon: the collapse of the formerly liberal left into two wings, one increasingly socialist, the other increasingly identity-focused; and the displacement of the formerly liberal right by unapologetically nativist, protectionist and populist upstarts.

Trying to detect a hidden order behind the rise of Trumpish figures around the world might be as pointless as a child's search for faces in the clouds. But there's a good chance that they really are linked. To find out how that happened will require letting go of local grievances and starting to look for the global thread that ties together such distant, disparate characters.

The most obvious candidate is the global financial crisis of 2008, which was certainly widespread, and offers eerie parallels with 1930s Europe. …

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