Jayne Miller CEO Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy

By Pitz, Marylynne; Post-Gazette | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), January 6, 2019 | Go to article overview

Jayne Miller CEO Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy


Pitz, Marylynne, Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


The following CORRECTION/CLARIFICATION appeared on January 9, 2019. A story Sunday about Jayne Miller, the CEO of the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, contained several errors. The PPC has completed 17 capital projects over the last 20 years. The projects' status was incorrect in the story. The conservancy is active in 22 parks but does not manage them, as the story indicated. In 2019, Ms. Miller will seek input from residents on all 165 city parks. The number of parks addressed was incorrect.

Jayne Miller grew up in New York's Adirondack Mountains, 45 miles southeast of Lake Placid.

Her father was a large- and small-animal veterinarian, and her family lived next door to the hospital where he worked. Ms. Miller spent a lot of time outdoors and encountered many stray animals. In the winter, her father flooded the yard to create a skating rink, and one year, they built a rope tow.

Now, Ms. Miller lives in a home that's a short walk from Highland Park with her partner, Diana Sepac. Articulate and focused, Ms. Miller, 60, is the new chief executive officer of the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy. Founded in 1996, the nonprofit is active at 22 parks. The PPC has completed 17 capital projects over the last 20 years.

Ms. Miller and Ms. Sepac became friends while both worked in Ann Arbor, Mich., during the 1990s and have been together for nearly 20 years. The two women have visited many national parks, including the Badlands, Big Bend, Bryce, the Grand Canyon, the Grand Tetons, Mammoth Cave, Mount Rainier, Saguaro, Theodore Roosevelt, Voyageurs, Yellowstone and Zion. …

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