How Artists Build Careers, and Why Minnesota Stands Out

By Markusen, Ann | MinnPost.com, November 21, 2018 | Go to article overview

How Artists Build Careers, and Why Minnesota Stands Out


Markusen, Ann, MinnPost.com


Last week I spent a day at University of Colorado’s College of Arts and Media. I’d been invited by their dynamic dean, Larry Kaptain, to present my decades’ long work on artists’ careers. We started over lunch with the dean and half a dozen of his faculty members. We met with the provost, who posed lots of intriguing questions about how an arts and media school can serve its larger community. How can they position their students for careers in a rapidly changing visual and electronic world? How to prepare them for nontraditional work settings – as entrepreneurs, consultants, and short-term employees as well as full-time positions.

My talk followed. I showcased artists who have fashioned careers by taking their work beyond the studio to make a living and contribute to communities near and far. Minneapolis’ Vara Kamin, for instance, discovered over time how to replicate her large, colorful and engaging paintings, created in her former studio in the California Building in northeast Minneapolis, for backlit installations. Hundreds of Kamin’s backlit images have been installed in hospitals and health care settings throughout the U.S. Check out her website: www.varakamin.com.

Projecting charts, tables and maps, I shared working artists’ high rates of self-employment, uncommonly high migration rates, cross-country and between rural towns and cities, and over the life cycle. Examples: For Minnesota, in child-rearing years and after retirement, artists leave the Twin Cities metro for Greater Minnesota homes in surprising numbers, while younger artists throng to the Cities. Nationally, self-employment rates are highest among writers, visual artists and musicians, 65 percent, 57 percent and 41 percent respectively. Performing artists, designers and architects less so, yet three times as likely to be self-employed as the national workforce as a whole.

And where artists work. The artist-rich industries: film, radio and TV; journalism; photography; colleges, universities and K-12 schools. Others work in industries where they form a small share of the workforce – musicians, for instance, in eating and drinking establishments. And where artists live: They’re much more likely to live closer in to central cities than the urban work force as a whole, especially performing artists.

I’ve served for 10 years on the National Advisory Board for the wordy Strategic National Arts Alumni Project. We’ve been surveying arts graduates of colleges, universities, conservatories and arts high schools, documenting how artists rate their training and where and how they are working now. About half of our respondents work in the arts, and another half work in other industries. Of the latter, may attest to how their arts training has helped them in their careers.

I also explored, from a California project I led, how arts organizations hire their workforce. Artists formed the vast majority of people (57 percent) who were paid by California arts nonprofits, but most work as temporary contractors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How Artists Build Careers, and Why Minnesota Stands Out
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.