At a Time in Which Many American Patriots Have Wondered Who within the Republican Party Will Now Be Present in Congress to Challenge the President for the Destruction That He Has Inflicted on Our Nation, Its Character and Our Values, We Have the Good Fortune to Be at the Dawn of the Congressional Leadership of Mitt Romney, Who Is Now the Junior Senator from Utah [Derived Headline]

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 12, 2019 | Go to article overview

At a Time in Which Many American Patriots Have Wondered Who within the Republican Party Will Now Be Present in Congress to Challenge the President for the Destruction That He Has Inflicted on Our Nation, Its Character and Our Values, We Have the Good Fortune to Be at the Dawn of the Congressional Leadership of Mitt Romney, Who Is Now the Junior Senator from Utah [Derived Headline]


At a time in which many American patriots have wondered who within the Republican Party will now be present in Congress to challenge the president for the destruction that he has inflicted on our nation, its character and our values, we have the good fortune to be at the dawn of the congressional leadership of Mitt Romney, who is now the junior senator from Utah.

Romney’s recent Washington Post opinion piece is a tour de force, a throwing down of the gauntlet to an abnormal and amoral president. It is no wonder that many members of what has become the Trumpublican Party are expressing concerns.

While expressing support for many of Donald Trump’s policies and actions, Romney challenges Trump for his actions, hateful words and deficient character, noting how he has used his victory to engage in name-calling and resentment and promising to continue to speak out against conduct which is “divisive, racist, sexist, anti-immigrant, dishonest or destructive to democratic institutions,” all of which are Trump hallmarks.

We now have reason to believe that the president’s expectation that he will have another “yes man” in Romney will not be reality.

May Romney continue to display the courage, decency and adherence to American values that are evident in his essay. We need more like him.

Oren Spiegler, South Strabane

New year, same soup?

On New Year’s Day, members of the Pennsylvania General Assembly were sworn in and seated. There were a few more women, some younger members, some more progressive Democrats and more moderate Republicans — but will there really be any change?

Will any one of them, or any bloc of them, pull this state into the 21st century? Or two years from now, will we still be relying on property taxes to fund an inequitable public school system? Still be paying to drive on a highway that should have been paid for decades ago? Will our roads be under endless construction, yet somehow come out the perennial worst in the nation?

Will we still be buying alcoholic beverages from a system set up after Prohibition? Will we continue to forgo billions in revenue with criminalized cannabis and no shale extraction fees? Will we still have a justice system skewed against certain communities?

Will our legislative and congressional districts remain drawn by partisan hacks? And, will we still have the nation’s largest, most bloated Legislature?

If any or all that nonsense is still in place two years from now, then no matter how you hype the new membership, it’s the same soup in a different bowl ... .

George Hawdon, Arnold

The Catholic Church will prevail

What to think of Bob Rocker’s letter “Priests are the ones who should have been confessing”? Like Rocker, all Catholics are angry, frustrated and feel betrayed by the scandal that has befallen our church. However, unlike Rocker, the vast majority of Catholics don’t think cutting and running is the proper response. Catholics have every right to expect their priests to be morally superior. However, we should not be Catholic because of such expectations. The vast majority of Catholics believe in and love their church and know it is worth fighting for.

How do we fight? Letters to the parish or bishop expressing our concerns, prayer, attending Mass on a regular basis, or just plain getting involved. We should not be Catholic because we hold church leaders to a position of moral superiority, but because of Catholic dogma. The Catholic Church has been a force for good in the world for over 2,000 years, and will continue to be so.

For myself, I’m Catholic because Jesus Christ was crucified and rose from the dead. I’m Catholic because of the sacraments, especially the most Holy Eucharist. I’m Catholic because of Mary, the Blessed Mother, and I’m Catholic because of the angels and saints. I’m proud to be a Catholic and cannot imagine a day in my life not being Catholic.

Jesus’ church will prevail; he promised it. …

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At a Time in Which Many American Patriots Have Wondered Who within the Republican Party Will Now Be Present in Congress to Challenge the President for the Destruction That He Has Inflicted on Our Nation, Its Character and Our Values, We Have the Good Fortune to Be at the Dawn of the Congressional Leadership of Mitt Romney, Who Is Now the Junior Senator from Utah [Derived Headline]
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