Research on Innovation Method of College English Translation Teaching under the Concept of Constructivism

By Liang, Hao; Li, Xiaopeng | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, October 2018 | Go to article overview

Research on Innovation Method of College English Translation Teaching under the Concept of Constructivism


Liang, Hao, Li, Xiaopeng, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


For the majority of college English translation courses, teachers still use traditional teaching modes to develop students' translation abilities (Wang, Guangyu, Mei & Wei,, 2011), teaching vocabulary, grammar, idioms and figures of speech in a traditional way (Lillywhite, Lee, Tippetts & Archibald, 2013); introducing translation criteria; comparing different sentence structures; providing examples of translation methods and techniques; or randomly selecting some fragments of the articles written by some famous writers for translation teaching practice, and then telling the students the reference answer (Du, Li & Fei, 2010). Of course, this traditional teaching method is very important and effective (Anco & Bluman, 2012). However, the traditional teaching mode is a passive learning process for students, lack of active teacher-student interaction and cooperation, and basic translation principles and rules, experience and skills cannot be effectively passed on to students (Zhang & Zhang, 2011), nor can students fully accept them, all of which are shortcomings of traditional translation teaching.

The traditional college English translation teaching model described above is behaviourism (Li, Wang, Zhang & Zhou, 2010), and behaviourists believe that the purpose of education is to transfer knowledge to learners, while the task of the learners is to achieve the goal set by the educators (Tsai, Lin, Lee, Chang & Hsu, 2013). It ignores the psychological process of learners in the process of knowledge transfer. After years of practice, more and more people have realized this shortcoming. In the 1960s, cognitivism replaced behaviourism as the dominant theory (Uzunoglu & Quriesh, 2012). More attention is focused on how to process and understand knowledge in the mind. The improvement of this theory resulted in constructivism. Constructivism initiated the modern teaching method of translation course, which makes educators think about how to produce a student-centered translation course (Yang et al., 2014). Thinking about how to change the teacher's function; thinking about how to activate the teaching of principles, theories, methods and skills in translation are issues of this paper to be discussed and practiced.

This paper first analyzes and studies the new standards of college English translation teaching reform and the problems existing in traditional teaching, and uses the theory of constructivism, and expounds the innovative teaching mode of improving college English translation teaching from the perspective of teachers and students. Then, this paper proposes four practical modes and teaching methods of college English translation teaching based on constructivism, and gives the concrete analysis and discussion, emphasizing the importance of cultivating students' initiative in the learning process and calling upon teachers to pay special attention to the development of students' ability of autonomous learning and continuous learning.

College English Translation Teaching Guided by Constructivism

Constructivism is a kind of philosophy theory, epistemology, or learning theory, and discusses how to construct the meaning of knowledge from the current knowledge structure. This theory on the nature of human learning guides the constructivist learning theory and teaching methods (Dori, Feldman & Sturm, 2012). Constructivism refers to that the learners are not passively waiting for the enrichment of knowledge, but when new knowledge enters into the learners' existing knowledge system, it's necessary to form a connection with the learners' previous knowledge and experience, and actively construct his own knowledge. Constructivism is regarded as one of the most prosperous learning theories nowadays. It pays more attention to learners' subjective cognition than all theories in history. Therefore, constructivism pays more attention to constructing an environment in which learners explore knowledge actively rather than passively. …

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