Attitudes toward Cultural Diversity: A Study of Russian Teachers

By Khairutdinova, Rezeda; Birman, Dina et al. | Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies, Spring 2019 | Go to article overview

Attitudes toward Cultural Diversity: A Study of Russian Teachers


Khairutdinova, Rezeda, Birman, Dina, Kalimullin, Aydar, Gromova, Chulpan, Semenova, Elena, Troska, Zulfia, Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies


1.Introduction and Literature Review

With the process of globalization many countries, including Russia, face the challenge of training and educating students who are ethnic and religious minorities. The Directive of June 29, 2000 issued by the committee of the Council of Europe (2001) has guaranteed the assistance of 'the increase of awareness on requirements of human rights and the duties following from this in democratic society' (point IV). With that in mind, the committee encouraged 'creation of a climate of active understanding and respect for culture of other people in an education system starting from the preschool level' (point III). Recognizing cultural diversity among students in educational institutions is particularly important in societies with a large number of migrants. Daily interactions with teachers make them one of the most important figures for newly arrived immigrant children in school. Therefore it is important to understand teacher attitudes toward diverse ethnic and religious groups represented in their classrooms, as attitudes contribute to shaping the relationships between teachers and immigrant students (Grant and Tate 1995; Nieto 2015).

The concept of attitudes has always attracted considerable attention, by both international and Russian scholars (Ajzen, Fishbein 2000; Schwarz, Bohner 2001; Paniotto 2006; Ostrom 2013; Lebedeva, Tatarko, Berry 2016; Abakumova, Boguslavskaya, Grishina 2016). 'Attitudes' is an important psychological construct, first introduced by sociologists Thomas and Znaniecki (1918) in their study of Polish immigrants coming to America in the early 20th century. They defined 'attitude' as 'a condition of consciousness of the individual in relation to some social value', or the experience by the person of the meaning of this value (Thomas, Znaniecki 1918). Such 'condition of consciousness' is manifested in a combination of a person's beliefs, feelings, behavior in relation to socially significant objects, groups, or events (Vaughan, Hogg 2005) revealed when evaluating a particular entity with some degree of favor or disfavor (Eagly, Chaiken 2007). In 1947 Smith suggested distinguishing three interconnected components of attitudes: cognitive, emotional and behavioral (Smith, Bruner, White 1956). Attitudes held by individuals are influenced by the culture of the surrounding society and their social experience (Allport 1935). Among social attitudes the most crucial ones are ethnic and religious. Formed through ethnocultural contacts, ethnic and religious attitudes may be positive or negative; they may strengthen emotionalevaluative attitudes both toward one's own ethnicity and religion and toward representatives of other ethnic and religious groups (Banks1995; Jackson 2011).

Banks et al. (2001) suggest that teachers in diverse societies need to respect and understand the complex characteristics of ethnic groups so they can build upon cultural strengths and characteristics that students from diverse groups bring to school. In the U.S., many teacher preparation programs do not incorporate ethnic and cultural content into the teacher education curriculum (Banks 1995; Ladson-Billings 1995). The authors suggest that teacher preparation must include having educators uncover their personal attitudes toward these groups and acquire knowledge about their histories and cultures. With knowledge and new information, attitudes, or the cognitive attitudinal system, can be changed, resulting in more positive or negative beliefs, convictions, and opinions (Shikhirev 1999). Therefore, assessing attitudes of teachers toward different ethnic and religious groups can help inform the development of teacher preparation programs that increase teacher knowledge and influence their attitudes.

In the context of the growing migration worldwide, scholars stress the importance of public schools in integrating migrants into the new societies and cultures. The role of the teacher in this process is critically important (Emler, Okhana, Moskovichi 1987). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Attitudes toward Cultural Diversity: A Study of Russian Teachers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.