There Would Be No Better 'Reparations' for Blacks Than to End Policies Promoting Reckless Behavior

By Scarry, Eddie | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, March 8, 2019 | Go to article overview

There Would Be No Better 'Reparations' for Blacks Than to End Policies Promoting Reckless Behavior


Scarry, Eddie, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


David Brooks must have slept like a baby after sending in his column on reparations for black Americans. It checked all the right boxes required for a condescending, liberal, white person to continue feeling morally superior without lifting a finger.

Credit where it's due, though. For his piece in the New York Times, Brooks did at least talk to a southern black lady.

Brooks wrote Thursday that he's had a spiritual awakening and now supports reparations for blacks in order to compensate for slavery's "collective debt that will have to be paid."

He describes his conversion from reparations opponent after "traveling around the country for the past few years studying America’s divides" and finding, "The racial divide doesn’t feel like the other divides. There is a dimension of depth to it that the other divides don’t have. It is more central to the American experience."

He wrote that he "had so many experiences over the past year — sitting, for example, with an elderly black woman in South Carolina shaking in rage because the kids in her neighborhood face greater challenges than she did growing up in 1953 — that suggest we are at another moment of make-or-break racial reckoning."

Brooks doesn't name the woman who was blessed to meet a rich, white man who wants to give her money on behalf of America. Not directly out of his pocket right now, mind you, but perhaps she'll get some from everyone else some day.

He goes into no detail about why "kids in her neighborhood face greater challenges than she did growing up in 1953," but I have some guesses that have nothing to do with slavery, like the breakdown of the nuclear family and the sprawling welfare state that has only weakened black communities. …

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