Research Whaling's 30-Year Struggle

The Daily Yomiuri (Toyko, Japan), April 4, 2019 | Go to article overview

Research Whaling's 30-Year Struggle


Japan's research whaling fleet led by the Nisshin Maru, an 8,145-ton vessel that has engaged in research whaling in the Antarctic Ocean for nearly 30 years, returned to Shimonoseki Port, Yamaguchi Prefecture, on Sunday.

The history of Japan's research whaling in the Antarctic Ocean has come to an end as the Japanese government withdraws from the International Whaling Commission and resumes commercial whaling in July.

"We never took down our Japanese flag in the Antarctic Ocean," said Koji Matsuoka, 52, a deputy division chief of the Tokyo-based Institute of Cetacean Research (ICR). "We kept the faith, at the very least, when we faced any kind of hindrance."

The Japanese government contracted the foundation to conduct research whaling.

Research whaling in the Antarctic Ocean had been undertaken by a fleet comprising five vessels led by the Nisshin Maru factory ship.

The research routine started with crew members scanning the ocean surface to find whales breaking the surface of the water to breathe. After the whales are spotted, the two vessels called whale catchers rush to the sites and catch the whales using tools such as harpoons. The two remaining ships conduct visual checks on the number of whales at the sites.

The catches are loaded onto the Nisshin Maru. On deck, crew take measurements of the whales' weight and dimensions, check their stomachs' contents and harvest samples for genetic analysis. Then the carcasses are stored in a freezer, brought back to Japan as "byproducts" of the research and sold in markets.

Research whaling began in November every year and lasted until the following March. On one voyage in recent years, the fleet caught 333 Antarctic minke whales.

Matsuoka participated 15 times in the research whaling voyages conducted by the fleet led for about 30 years by the Nisshin Maru.

As expedition leader, Matsuoka has led about 200 crew members in their 20s and 30s during 150-day voyages.

But research whaling has come under harsh criticism by anti-whaling countries and organizations.

In particular, Sea Shepherd, an anti-whaling organization, rammed its boats against vessels of the Japanese fleet. Sea Shepherd activists also threw bottles containing butyric acid, which discharges a strong odor, and smoke canisters onto the Japanese ships many times.

"As I feared what I would be able to do if we were attacked while sleeping," Matsuoka said, "I was unable to sleep almost every day during each of the voyages. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Research Whaling's 30-Year Struggle
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.