'I Get to Learn More Stuff': Children's Understanding of Wellbeing at School in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

By Huynh, Elizabeth; Stewart-Tufescu, Ashley | International Journal of Emotional Education, April 2019 | Go to article overview

'I Get to Learn More Stuff': Children's Understanding of Wellbeing at School in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


Huynh, Elizabeth, Stewart-Tufescu, Ashley, International Journal of Emotional Education


First submission 4th F ebruary 2018; Accepted for publication 8th April 2019.

Introduction

Subjective wellbeing has been associated to a child's sense of belonging and their perceived ability to participate in social settings (Stoecklin, 2013). In the last decade, there has been a shift towards understanding wellbeing through engagement with children, and a shift away from relying on objective measures (Statham & Chase, 2010) and third-party, adult-centric assessments of children's well-being (BenArieh, Casas, Frønes, & Korbin, 2014). Emphasis has been placed on capturing children's perspectives on what the concept of wellbeing means to them (Hicks, Newton, Haynes, & Evans, 2011), and the values, perceptions, domains, and experience of children in relation to the concept of wellbeing (Fattore, Mason, & Watson, 2017; White, 2008).

To fully understand children's wellbeing means to authentically acknowledge children as active beings in their life, and in research (Fattore et al., 2017). However, some significant challenges to achieve these ends have been noted in the field of child wellbeing research. According to Fattore, Fegter and Hunner-Kreisel (2018), two of these challenges include how to define 'wellbeing' theoretically, and how to integrate children's perspectives in research. Previously work done by Rose and McAuley (2010) in the United Kingdom (2010) noted that if researchers are to advance the field of child wellbeing more must be done to understand how children can help to shape our understanding of their lives, and how children can become even more actively involved in measuring, understanding, and monitoring their own wellbeing.

Previous research has also noted that the concept of wellbeing is multifaceted, (Fattore et al., 2017) and studies have shown that children's environment may have lasting effects on subjective wellbeing, and with notably differences between countries (Bradshaw, Keung, Rees, & Goswami, 2011; Inglehart & Klingemann, 2000). In Canada, it is required by law for children to attend school beginning at age 5 until the age 16. Children between the ages of 8 and 12 are considered to be elementary students in grades four to six. In these grades, children spend approximately 6-7 hours of their day, five days per week, for 10 months of the year in the school environment. Given children spend a considerable amount of their childhood in school, it is not surprising that school has a significant influence on their development and wellbeing (Kutsar & Kasearu, 2017). The educational experience has also been recognized as an important factor in more complex understandings of children's perceptions of wellbeing (Andresen, 2014), and as such is an important dimension to examine in the wider context of understanding children's perceptions of wellbeing. Moreover, because elementary school children spend the majority of their classroom time learning from a single teacher, it is also not surprising that the quality of the teacher-student relationship (characterized by warmth/closeness and conflict/rejection) has been shown to have a significant influence on children's perceptions of their wellbeing and appraisal for school and learning (Roorda, Koomen, Spilt, & Oort, 2011).

Jellesma, Zee, & Koomen (2015) investigated this relationship between children's perceptions of the quality of the teacher-child relationships and children's internalizing problems and appraisals of interactions with their teacher. Using a sample of 500 school-aged children in grades three to five, the authors found that the children's perceptions of the quality of the teacher-student relationship- assessed as either conflictual or warm, and children's self-reported internalizing behavioural issues were mediated by children's appraisals for teacher-student interactions. They also found that these results were stronger for relationships characterized by conflict and negative appraisal compared to positive teacher-child relationships and positive appraisal. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'I Get to Learn More Stuff': Children's Understanding of Wellbeing at School in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.