Today in Music History - May 12

The Canadian Press, May 3, 2019 | Go to article overview

Today in Music History - May 12


Today in Music History - May 12

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Today in Music History for May 12:

In 1910, composer, arranger and conductor Gordon Jenkins was born in Webster Groves, Mo. He is the man responsible for bringing the ground-breaking folk group "The Weavers" to a mass audience. He died May 1, 1984.

In 1928, pop composer Burt Bacharach was born in Kansas City. His songs, many featuring lyrics by Hal David, played a major role in 1960s pop music. They wrote nearly 40 hits for Dionne Warwick including "Walk on By," "I Say a Little Prayer" and "Do You Know the Way to San Jose?"

In 1948, rock guitarist and keyboards player Steve Winwood was born in Birmingham, England. He burst on the British pop music scene as the 16-year-old lead vocalist and organist with "The Spencer Davis Group," who had hits with "I'm a Man" and "Gimme Some Lovin'." In 1967, Winwood formed "Traffic" with Dave Mason, Chris Wood and Jim Capaldi and led that band to the top of the British charts. A year later, Winwood joined "Blind Faith," the first rock supergroup which lasted only one album. After "Traffic" re-formed for a couple of albums in the '70s, Winwood pursued a solo career. His 1986 album "Back in the High Life" won Grammy awards for record of the year and top male vocal performance. In 1998, Winwood appeared in the film "Blues Brothers 2000."

In 1956, the Sun Record Co. in Memphis ran an ad in the music trade papers announcing the first record by what was termed "one of the truly great talent finds." The artist was Johnny Cash, and the record was "I Walk the Line."

In 1960, Elvis Presley appeared on Frank Sinatra's "Timex Spectacular" on ABC TV. Presley sang one of Sinatra's hits, "Witchcraft," while Sinatra tackled "Love Me Tender."

In 1963, Bob Dylan walked off "The Ed Sullivan Show" when CBS censors wouldn't let him perform the "Talking John Birch Society Blues."

In 1964, "Peter, Paul and Mary" won a Grammy Award for the song "Blowin' in the Wind." "Deep Purple" by Nino Tempo and April Stevens won the Best Rock and Roll Recording award.

In 1965, "The Rolling Stones" began a two-day recording session at Chess Studios in Chicago, laying down the basic tracks for "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction."

In 1965, Canadian songwriter-music publisher Gordon V. Thompson died in Toronto at age 76. During the First World War, his patriotic tunes included such titles as "Red Cross Nell and Khaki Jim," "When We Wind Up the Watch on the Rhine" and "Back to the Farm with a Farmerette."

In 1967, the psychedelic sound and light show of "Pink Floyd" graced the stage of the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London. The concert, called "Games For May," was the first to feature quadraphonic sound.

In 1968, Jimi Hendrix was arrested at the U.S.-Canada border for possession of heroin and hashish. Hendrix, on his way to a concert in Toronto, claimed the drugs were planted. He was later cleared of the charges.

In 1971, Mick Jagger of "The Rolling Stones" married Nicaraguan fashion model Bianca Perez Morena de Macias in the town hall of St. Tropez on the French Riviera. Besides other members of band," guests included Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and Stephen Stills. They divorced in February 1979.

In 1974, Ottawa's Morning Music Club presented its last concert after 82 years of activities. The club had been in existence since 1892, presenting chamber music and solo recitals by internationally-renowned artists. The group initially held its recitals in the morning, but by 1946, all concerts were in the evening.

In 1975, "Jefferson Starship" gave a free concert in New York's Central Park. The event cost the group and a local radio station $14,000 in cleanup and damages.

In 1979, the new "Jefferson Starship," with Mickey Thomas replacing Grace Slick as lead vocalist, debuted at a free concert in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. Thomas had been the lead singer on Elvin Bishop's 1976 hit "Fooled Around and Fell in Love. …

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