A Social Justice Recap and Challenge to Move Forward

By Barrett, Charles; Proctor, Sherrie L. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, May 2019 | Go to article overview

A Social Justice Recap and Challenge to Move Forward


Barrett, Charles, Proctor, Sherrie L., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


On the heels of a very successful annual convention that brought more than 5,000 attendees to Atlanta, social justice—NASP's most recent strategic goal—was well represented. For example, entering “social justice” in the search field of the convention's mobile app, more than 20 sessions, including committee meetings, interest group networking sessions, mini-skills sessions, papers, posters, practitioner conversations, and symposia were available. Whether focusing on assessment practices, teaching and classroom management, implicit biases in early childhood settings, advocacy and policy, building effective family–school partnerships, counseling, or positive behavior intervention and supports, attendees were afforded numerous opportunities to learn how social justice can be infused into all aspects of the field. From informal conversations during the regional leadership meeting, to a dynamic keynote address by noted educator Michael Bonner, and an informative fireside chat about race with clinical psychologist and bestselling author Beverly Tatum, social justice permeated the convention in ways that have not existed in previous years.

Notably, the newly formed Social Justice Committee (SJC) sponsored a Special Session: Social Justice: Advancing the Strategic Goal in Research and Practice. Moderated by Charles Barrett, Sherrie Proctor, and Dave Shriberg, a gathering of graduate students, faculty, and practitioners engaged in rich small group discussions about the social justice implications for school psychology research, practice, and advocacy. Designed to elicit meaningful feedback from those who are active in the field, the information gathered will inform the SJC's efforts related to advancing and infusing principles of social justice throughout NASP and the larger professional community. Specifically, as the SJC prepares to focus on the social justice implications of poverty and how school psychologists serve children, families, schools, and communities who are impacted by issues related to poverty throughout 2019–2020, insight from participants will be incorporated into forthcoming projects.

A CHALLENGE

As the inaugural leaders of the SJC, we are intentional about how we engage the school psychology community around issues related to social justice. …

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