Lindsay Lohan Wants Back In

By Wagmeister, Elizabeth | Variety, January 9, 2019 | Go to article overview

Lindsay Lohan Wants Back In


Wagmeister, Elizabeth, Variety


GROWING UP, LINDSAY LOHA WAS THRILLED WHEN SHE SAW HERSELF IN A TRASHY MAGAZINE.

"The first time I was in a tabloid," she says, "I was like, 'Oh, my God, I feel like Britney Spears!' because she was in a tabloid and I felt cool. Little did I know what would happen from there."

Lohan suffered one of the biggest crashes in Hollywood history After starring in "The Parent Trap" at 12 and climbing onto the A-list because of "Mean Girls," she was poised to become one of the stars of her generation. But she was held back by her own bad choices. After a stint in rehab, Lohan was arrested in 2007 for a DUI, possession of cocaine and a misdemeanor hit-andrun. Five more arrests followed, along with more visits to rehab, court hearings, jail time, house arrest and a necklace-stealing scandal. Her last theatrical movie, "The Canyons," came out six years ago, and even independent directors stopped casting her because she wouldn't show up to set.

Lohan, 32, has decamped the United States for Dubai, where she lives full-time. She's entered the hospitality business, with three clubs in Greece and an island she's designing called Lindsay Land. Now, she's taking on another surprise job: MTV reality star. "Lindsay Lohan's Beach Club," which premieres Jan. 8, chronicles her life in Mykonos. This latest reincarnation of Lindsay is more muted than what we've seen in the past (including a failed 2014 docuseries on OWN). In the pilot, Lohan seems to be channeling Bravo's Lisa Vanderpump. She wants you to see her as a connected entrepreneur with her own staff and hospitality empire.

During a recent rainy Friday afternoon in downtown Manhattan, Lohan makes it clear she's ready for a comeback and wants to star in movies again, including a sequel of "Mean Girls." She's nervous about talking to press, frequently taking cigarette breaks on the balcony of a swanky penthouse hotel room in Soho. On the day before our interview, she reached out to her old publicist, Leslie Sloane, because she didn't want to face journalists on her own. Returning to Hollywood may not be easy One sign of how many bridges she's burned: Several of her former colleagues declined to be interviewed about what it was like to work with her.

Here's what Lohan has to say about her new life and her future ambitions.

Why do you think people don't want to hire you?

I think there's a misconception that people still have about me, and I think it's unfortunate. Hopefully, this will change people's perception once and for all.

You've said that you wish your past would stay in the past.

And now we're talking about it again.

But you've made many mistakes in the public eye.

Ten years ago. I just don't want to seem like a martyr. But it's in the past. I always say to people, "You do realize that was over 10 years ago?" But it was definitely unfair and unjust at certain times, especially as a girl. I worked at the morgue [as part of a judge's ruling for violating probation after allegedly stealing a necklace]. I've been through the ringer. It was horrible. But from those things, I became a lot stronger.

Do you believe that there's a Disney curse?

I don't feel cursed.

A lot of child stars have struggled with substance abuse and other issues.

It was different then. There was less protection. So maybe that was the struggle. People know you so young and people are chasing you, and then instead of going to college, you have a month or two months off and you want to go to a club and that's "bad." I don't think there's any curse with Disney. That's just a dark thing to say. If anything, it was a blessing, because we're all still here.

Do you think there is a double standard with the way women are portrayed in the media?

No. If you think about it, back when I was being followed, there were more tabloids. We didn't have Instagram. We couldn't control social media on our own and have our own voice. So I think times have changed. …

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