Letters to the Editor, June 13

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), June 13, 2019 | Go to article overview

Letters to the Editor, June 13


Heartbreaking choices behind abortion decisions

While serving on the Children and Families Committee during my six years in the Missouri House of Representatives, abortion bills were heard every session. Very personal stories were told, often about heartbreaking decisions to end a pregnancy. Yes, accidental pregnancies were tough choices, in difficult circumstances.

Learning that a much-wanted child was not developing as it should was truly heartbreaking. There were no lungs, or the brain was the size a kidney should be, or the joints were malformed, causing an excruciatingly painful death of the child shortly after birth. And the list goes on.

To be forced to continue four or five months more of such a pregnancy in such dire circumstances is inhumane. All who came to testify to such circumstances chose to discontinue their pregnancy and had some kind of ceremony for the life that could have been.

Often both parents came to us with their stories of choices made due to an anomaly. No one came forward to tell us they sought an abortion due to Down syndrome -- no one. Down syndrome children live. Those with missing or undeveloped organs do not.

But that is not the question. The question is one for the woman alone. It is her body. It is her decision. Period.

Missouri's new abortion ban is the first step in state-sanctioned religion and the first step on the slippery slope of losing our five freedoms guaranteed in the First Amendment.

Sue Meredith - Creve CoeurFormer Missouri state representative

President Trump seemingly living in Obama's shadow

Regarding "Trump says tariffs on Mexico suspended indefinitely" (June 9): In facing criticism of his reworked tariff agreement with Mexico, President Donald Trump claims unfair analysis by the media. Then he mentions that former President Barack Obama was never unfairly treated like this.

Previously, candidate Trump spearheaded the movement denying the American birth of President Obama, before finally dismissing the accusation. Another time, Trump questioned the academic record of Obama.

Apparently, President Trump consistently views the shadow of his predecessor in a compelling negative light. Of course, some voters, but not most, will find this inspiring. So the nation gets what it voted for. Enjoy the beauty of democracy.

Ted Morrison - Rock Hill

WWII goal was to defeat fascism, not help Trump

Regarding "British should remember history and respect president" (June 8): The letter writer suggested that the British should accord more respect to President Donald Trump because, if it had not been for the United States, German would now be the primary language of England.

The U.S. intervention in World War II was significant and a game changer, but the British had been fighting Germany for two years before the U.S. joined in. Germany was far from certain of success once it engaged with the Soviet Union.

The goal of the war was to crush the threat of fascism and right wing nationalism. It was not, and I say this respectfully, so that President Trump could insult his hosts, interfere in Great Britain's domestic politics, and push his business interests. …

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