Performance Rating -Setting the Right Standards

Management Services, Summer 2019 | Go to article overview

Performance Rating -Setting the Right Standards


We recently looked at the difference between MTM100 and BS100 and identified when 100 was not 100 (see MSJ Winter 2018). This raised another practical point to do with Performance Rating.

Performance Rating is not a work measurement technique in its own right. It enables us to formally measure specified methods, using Time Study and Rated Activity Sampling techniques and establish the work content of a job - not simply to use the time taken to do it, which may vary from person to person and possibly the nature of the job and materials.

To clarify

The objective of work measurement is to measure human work which consists of many of the same basic movements.

Performance Rating assesses how well an individual carries out those movements. Just as the judgement of the speed of your car is influenced by different factors, so is the judgement of a person's performance. Three key factors affect the time it takes a person to carry out a task, any task. The first is the speed of the person's movements.

Speed

Many people mistakenly believe that Performance Rating is only concerned with how quickly a person works. There are some activities where speed of movement is the only factor that affects the time. The most obvious activity would be walking, even though there are many different styles of walking. The main thing that determines the time it takes for someone to walk a given distance is how quickly or slowly they walk.

Pace is literally only a fraction of performance

It is quite easy to classify the different speeds in broad terms such as slow, brisk, very fast etc. With a little more practice, it is perfectly feasible to start making judgements using a numerical scale. Performance Rating is based on such a scale and because we want to measure all work against a common standard, we need to give it a number. On the BSI scale Standard Performance is 100. This is the benchmark used by the observer to assess performance.

So, speed of movement influences performance. But so does the effectiveness of the effort.

Effective effort

You know the sort of person who always works very quickly and because they move so quickly, the impression they give is that they are extremely good workers, and they may well be. Performance Rating, however, requires very close observation. Often, although every action is carried out very quickly, some of the movements might not be necessary to advance the task and therefore the effort is less effective. This obviously affects performance. Equally, we need to recognise the effective effort of someone carrying, moving or pulling something whilst they are walking.

Conversely, there are people who never rush around and always appear to be working at a steady pace. When watched closely, although their speed of movement is not very high, every movement advances the task - they never waste movement, effort or energy. …

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