NAACP Files Lawsuit against Secretary DeVos for Changes to Processing of Civil Rights Complaints

By Yeldell, Cynthia | The Crisis, Summer 2018 | Go to article overview

NAACP Files Lawsuit against Secretary DeVos for Changes to Processing of Civil Rights Complaints


Yeldell, Cynthia, The Crisis


The NAACP along with the National Federation of the Blind and the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates has filed a lawsuit against U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos for making policy changes that will mandate the dismissal of valid civil rights complaints.

The lawsuit states that in March 2018, the Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights revised its Case Processing Manual to include new provisions requiring mandatory dismissal of certain complaints - regardless of their merit - and elimination of the right to appeal any dismissal of a civil rights complaint. DOE officials say the changes are to better manage its docket.

Bradford Berry, general counsel of the NAACP, said that because these changes allow for the mandatory dismissal of complaints without investigation, they can be used to prevent organizations like the NAACP, which has chapters across the country, from filing complaints based on patterns of discriminatory practices they see.

"The DOE seems to have lost its mission compass," Berry said. "They believe the objective is to clear the docket when what they should be doing is investigating alleged civil rights violations."

The mission of the Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights (OCR), according to its website, is to ensure equal access to education and to promote educational excellence throughout the nation through vigorous enforcement of civil rights.

Liz Hill, press secretary at the U.S. Department of Education, said that while the organization can't comment on pending litigation, the DOE's Office is the product of many months of collaboration among its career investigators and career managers reflecting their commitment to robustly investigating and correcting civil rights issues.

"Case processing procedures in the new CPM allow OCR to better accomplish this critical mission by improving OCR's management of its docket, investigations and case resolutions/' Hill said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

NAACP Files Lawsuit against Secretary DeVos for Changes to Processing of Civil Rights Complaints
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.