Former Hearst Magazines International President, Yale Graduate, Dies at 81

New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), August 7, 2019 | Go to article overview

Former Hearst Magazines International President, Yale Graduate, Dies at 81


NEW YORK, August 6, 2019 - George Green, former president and chief executive officer of Hearst Magazines International, died August 5 at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City from complications of pneumonia. He was 81.

Green, whose service at Hearst spanned more than 35 years, retired in June of 2009 but retained an affiliation with the company as a consultant.

Green joined Hearst Magazines in 1984 as executive vice president/group publishing director, initially responsible for seven titles. He was elected president of Hearst Magazines International (HMI) in September 1989 when Hearst formed the division. At that time, HMI published 28 licensed editions around the world. In his capacity as president and CEO of HMI, Green expanded it to more than 200 licensed or joint-ventured editions of Hearst Magazines in 55 countries in 36 languages for distribution in more than 100 countries. He was also executive vice president of Hearst Magazines and vice president of Hearst.

“In his 20 years as its leader, George Green built Hearst Magazines International into a global powerhouse, establishing operations in Russia and China and many other nations,” said Hearst President and CEO Steven R. Swartz. “He was a visionary with extraordinary product and dealmaking skills and an uncanny instinct for the next great emerging market.”

Frank A. Bennack Jr., Hearst executive vice chairman and former CEO, said: “George Green was a major player in the publishing world, and his contribution to Hearst was exceptional. The decision Gil Maurer and I made to put him in charge of the nascent international publishing business turned out to be inspired. It would be impossible to believe that anyone could have achieved more.”

Green came to Hearst from The New Yorker where he served as president and chief operating officer. Green was elected to the board of directors in 1973 and was named vice president in 1974, before being elected president and chief operating officer in 1975.

During his presidency, earnings at The New Yorker increased eight of the nine years, and the stock appreciated from $7 to $160 per share. Advance Communication acquired The New Yorker Magazine, Inc. in 1985 at $200 per share. Green drew equal satisfaction representing the company on the softball field during its Crusader League championship year; he also edited the company newsletter, a means to let employees at every level feel connected and included in the company's achievements. …

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