The 21st-Century Concert Experience Largely Means Having One's Focus on the Stage Compromised by the Glow from Someone's Cell Phone, or Having a View Obscured by People Taking Photos or Making Video Recordings of Their Favorite Song [Derived Headline]

By Guggenheimer, Paul | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 12, 2019 | Go to article overview

The 21st-Century Concert Experience Largely Means Having One's Focus on the Stage Compromised by the Glow from Someone's Cell Phone, or Having a View Obscured by People Taking Photos or Making Video Recordings of Their Favorite Song [Derived Headline]


Guggenheimer, Paul, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The 21st-century concert experience largely means having one's focus on the stage compromised by the glow from someone's cell phone, or having a view obscured by people taking photos or making video recordings of their favorite song.

That won't be the case at Stage AE Tuesday night, however, when Jack White and The Raconteurs take the stage at the popular North Shore concert venue. That's because the rock band is playing phone-free shows on their tour. No photos, video or audio recording devices are allowed.

White says he doesn't like cell phones and doesn't even own one. He has banned them from his concerts since 2018, according to billboard.com.

"We think you'll enjoy looking up from your gadgets for a little while and experiencing music and our shared love of it in person," said a statement issued by tour management.

The way it works is that upon arrival at the venue, all phones and other photo or video-capturing devices are secured in a so-called Yondr pouch. Yondr is a company that makes mobile phone pouches which close with a proprietary lock, and a device for unlocking them,

Audience members maintain possession of their phones at all times and can access them in designated phone use areas located in the venue.

Amy Cooper, Director of Marketing for Stage AE, said it's not an unusual policy anymore.

"It's not unprecedented," said Cooper. "It's very common for comedy tours to implement the Yondr bags."

In fact, Rolling Stone reported that Dave Chappelle is a Yondr enthusiast who recently told an audience, "You all need a break from that s___."

Brian Naccarelli ,39, of Dormont, is a Raconteurs fans and plans to attend Tuesday night's show. He says that he attended Jack White's last Stage AE show in 2014 where fans were asked to refrain from using their cell phones.

But that was on a voluntary basis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The 21st-Century Concert Experience Largely Means Having One's Focus on the Stage Compromised by the Glow from Someone's Cell Phone, or Having a View Obscured by People Taking Photos or Making Video Recordings of Their Favorite Song [Derived Headline]
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.