Editors' Introduction

By Berkowitz, Marvin W.; Benninga, Jacques S. | Journal of Character Education, January 1, 2019 | Go to article overview

Editors' Introduction


Berkowitz, Marvin W., Benninga, Jacques S., Journal of Character Education


Welcome to the first issue of the 15th volume of the Journal of Character Education. As frequently happens, there is an innovation in this rendering of the JCE. While we have had many guest-edited themed issues in the past, this is the first time we have had a "Special Section" with a thematic focus in a more general issue. The Center for Moral Science Education at Reitaku University in Japan proposed a focus on moralogy. Moralogy is a field of study originated by Chikuro Hiroike well over a century ago. The term itself is a rendering of morality and science, but it encompasses much more. The three articles in this section are quite disparate, while all focusing on Hiroike and moralogy, but from very different perspectives. The first is an overview of moralogy and presents the ideas of its founder, Dr. Hiroike. It is written by Osamu Nakayama, who has recently retired as president of Reitaku University and is now teaching at the Graduate School of Education, and by his colleague, Kenichi Eshima.

The second is by Peter Luff, who has worked at Reitaku University. His focus is a comparison of the thinking of Hiroike and Felix Adler, because he sees both as responding to ethical crises due to modernity and societal secularization at about the same time in history albeit in different places. The third article in this special section is by Kristján Kristjánsson, a philosopher at the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtue at the University of Birmingham (England), about the relevance of moralogy to the study of moral examplars. …

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