A Turn of a Phrase

By Strate, Lance | et Cetera, July 2016 | Go to article overview

A Turn of a Phrase


Strate, Lance, et Cetera


a turn of a phrase

can go on for days

it's a merry-go-round

of meaning and sound

a turn of a phrase

is a spinning top

it can make you dizzy

'til it comes to a stop

a turn of a phrase

is a Hanukah dreidel

it won't stand for long

it's fundamentally unstable

a turn of a phrase

is a Whirling Dervish

dancing in a manner

more than a little curvish

a turn of a phrase

is a voyeur's gaze

when you're least aware

it makes you stop and stare

a turn of a phrase

is a crazy carousel

ride the painted ponies

and fall under its spell

a turn of a phrase

is a spinning wheel

if you prick your finger

it might never heal

a turn of a phrase

is a turn of the key

it can open your mind

and unlock mystery

a turn of a phrase

is an endless maze

just around the bend

is another dead end

a turn of a phrase

like a turn of the screw

tightens its grip

trapping me and you

a turn of a phrase

is a linguistic maelstrom

a whirlpool of words

you may never escape from

a turn of a phrase

is like the Earth on its axis

day follows night

like death follows taxes

a turn of a phrase

is a roundabout

whether you're coming or going

it's hard to get out

a turn of a phrase

is a revolving door

better exit quickly

or you'll be in for more

a turn of a phrase

is just a phase

of language gone mad

it's a passing fad

a turn of a phrase

is just circular reasoning

it's gourmet cooking

with spices and seasoning

a turn of a phrase

is a centrifugal force

with great gravity

a weighty discourse

a turn of a phrase

swings and sways

like a pendulum do

that's English for you

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