Meet Ernie Almonte, CGFM, CPA, CFE: AGA's National President-Elect

By Yodzis, Mary Margaret | The Journal of Government Financial Management, Summer 2019 | Go to article overview

Meet Ernie Almonte, CGFM, CPA, CFE: AGA's National President-Elect


Yodzis, Mary Margaret, The Journal of Government Financial Management


Twenty-five years ago, Rhode Island's new auditor general was invited to join AGA. At first, he said no, then his colleagues convinced him to reconsider. Today, Ernie Almonte stands ready to become National President of AGA, calling his membership a great opportunity. "Little did I know AGA would propel my career by improving my skill sets and leadership abilities and vastly expanding my network. It all led me to this point," he said.

Personable, open and warm, Ernie is a first-generation American, former shoeshine boy, and son of an Italian immigrant. He and Kathy, his wife of 37 years "who continues to light up my life," reared five sons and now dote on four grandchildren. "I smile when I even think about them!" he added.

Ernie brings this same passion for building personal relationships to other aspects of his life. "We must always improve our skill sets so we're ready for the future. Equally important, though, is to always treat other people with respect and help them succeed as we advance. We owe this to each other as human beings and as leaders in our communities and profession."

In a career that includes 16 years as state auditor general, a term as chair of the American Institute of CPA's board of directors and recipient of its highest award, the Gold Medal for Distinguished Service, Ernie recognizes the need to prepare for imminent change. Now a partner in global accounting firm RSM's Boston office, he plans to focus his AGA presidency on "future-proofing" the profession, advancing opportunities for women and underrepresented groups, and promoting inclusivity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Meet Ernie Almonte, CGFM, CPA, CFE: AGA's National President-Elect
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.