Prisoners of War and Those Missing in Action Honored at Punchbowl Cemetery on National POW/MIA Recognition Day

By Cole, William | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, September 21, 2019 | Go to article overview

Prisoners of War and Those Missing in Action Honored at Punchbowl Cemetery on National POW/MIA Recognition Day


Cole, William, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


Cpl. Wilfred K. Hussey Jr. volunteered for Army service in July 1949 just a month after he graduated from Hilo High School.

First sent to Japan, the 19-year-old participated in the Inchon landing in the Korean War and then was reported missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950, as his unit, the 31st Infantry Regiment, battled Chinese forces in brutal subzero temperatures near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea.

Hussey remained missing for nearly 69 years — until his remains were recently identified.

On Friday the Hilo soldier was remembered on National POW/MIA Recognition Day at Punchbowl cemetery as one of more than 200 formerly missing service members who have been accounted for over the past year by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

“National POW/MIA recognition Day is the day set aside to pause and honor the service and sacrifice of all of our prisoners of war and those who are still unaccounted for, as well as their families,” Rear Adm. Jon Kreitz, deputy director of the accounting agency, said at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

In global conflicts dating back to World War II, more than 138,000 Americans have been held as POWs, with 16,800 dying in captivity, Kreitz told more than 400 people in attendance at the ceremony.

More than 81,000 Americans remain missing from conflicts back to World War II, he said.

“That’s a staggering number, especially when you think about all of the families who watched their loved ones go off to war — only to never have them return,” Kreitz said.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which has a lab and offices at Hickam Field, estimates that nearly 39,000 of the missing are potentially recoverable.

A black-and-white POW/MIA flag flew beneath the Stars and Stripes at the Honolulu Memorial at Punchbowl, and the same flags were flown over the White House, U.S. Capitol and at other locations around the country.

“As Americans, it is our sacred duty to pay tribute to the brave men and women of our armed forces for their service and sacrifice, especially those who endured unimaginable physical and emotional trauma as prisoners of war and those who never returned to American soil,” President Donald Trump said in a proclamation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Prisoners of War and Those Missing in Action Honored at Punchbowl Cemetery on National POW/MIA Recognition Day
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.