Which Timothy Egan Book Will You Bring to the Bing? Washington Native Is in Spokane on Oct. 29

The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), October 20, 2019 | Go to article overview

Which Timothy Egan Book Will You Bring to the Bing? Washington Native Is in Spokane on Oct. 29


If you go

What: Northwest Passages and Auntie's Bookstore present Timothy Egan, author of "A Pilgrimage to Eternity: From Canterbury to Rome in Search of a Faith"

When: 7 p.m. Oct. 29; doors open at 6 p.m. Come early to enjoy a cocktail and live music.

Where: The Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave.

Tickets: General admission is $6; get tickets at spokane7tickets.com. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. VIP tickets, at $45, include pre-event reception with the author at Ovations, drink ticket, copy of the book and reserved premium seating.

Get the book: It's OK to read ahead! The book will be released on Oct. 15. Auntie's will have the book for a 15% discount for Northwest Passage Book Club members. It also will be available the night of the event.

Info: spokesman.com/bookclub

The phrase "Spokane's own" comes to mind as Timothy Egan returns for a stop on his book tour.

A Washington native - born in Seattle, raised in Spokane, Timothy Egan has a Husky pedigree with a degree from the University of Washington. Brought up with a love for the Pacific Northwest that was instilled by his mother, Egan became a reporter for the Seattle Post Intelligencer.

He got his break to work as a Pacific Northwest correspondent for the New York Times in 1991 during one of the worst oil disasters in American history - the Exxon Valdez spill - and he's been writing for it ever since. In 2001, Egan shared the Pulitzer Prize with fellow New York Times reporters for the project "How Race Is Lived in America."

Here's a quick rundown of his work that is interspersed between his bi-weekly opinion column for the New York Times

"A Pilgrimage to Eternity: From Canterbury to Rome in Search of a Faith" (2019)

This personal story melds a journey over the ancient trail of Via Francigena and a history of Christianity.

Reviews are in: "A pilgrimage to find religion - or truth, or the way - that pleasingly blends memoir, travelogue and history."

"The Immortal Irishman" (2017)

New York Times Bestseller, winner of 2017 Montana Book Award

An epic story of a legendary Irishman leaving you wondering how on earth all of these things could possibly happen to one person. File this one under difficult to believe but true: the story of Thomas Meagher (1823-1867), an Irishman radicalized by the famine who became a hero on three continents.

Meagher led a failed uprising against British rule, was then banished to Tasmania for life, but then moved to New York to become one of the most famous Irish Americans. Fighting for justice was in Meagher's lifebook, so he joined the U.S. Army during the Civil War, rising to the rank of brigadier general. There is even a Currier & Ives print depicting one of his successful battles.

Meagher later moved to Montana, where he was acting governor at the request of President Andrew Johnson. Meagher then died under mysterious circumstances. Records indicate that he fell overboard while sick - or drunk - traveling by steamboat down the Missouri River. Egan suggests Meagher may have been murdered.

"Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher" (2012)

Carnegie Award for Best Fiction

The name of Edward Curtis (1868-1952) is eponymous with American Indian photography, but how did that evolve? In 1896 while running a Seattle photography studio, Curtis photographed Chief Seattle's impoverished daughter Angelina (Kick-is-om-lo). Curtis was astounded that she was living in poverty in the city named for her father.

Photographing this population of original Americans consumed his life, and Curtis then made it his life's mission to photograph and chronicle Native Americans all over the country. …

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