State, Local Laws Might Present 'Twists and Turns'

By Rosenberg, Joyce | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), November 24, 2019 | Go to article overview

State, Local Laws Might Present 'Twists and Turns'


Rosenberg, Joyce, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


BY JOYCE ROSENBERG

The Associated Press

When American Rhino, a retailer inside Boston's Faneuil Hall, expanded to an unused space on the landmark building's second floor, the company discovered the labyrinth that is local laws and ordinances.

"There were lots of twists and turns - you really don't know what's going to happen next," says Annie Venditti, the company's vice president of operations. "You learn by trial and tribulation."

As American Rhino renovated the space, it had to work with the Fire Department, going through multiple inspections that turned up more requirements it had to comply with - for example, where lights had to be placed. Then, when the space was ready and the retailer wanted to rent it out for events, there was back-and-forth with liquor licensing officials.

State and local laws and ordinances can be vexing for small-business owners who find they have a list of requirements to comply with while trying to run their companies. And laws continually go on the books as officials look after the welfare of citizens, workers and the environment. The laws and ordinances might affect businesses of all sizes, but small companies can find compliance more difficult because they don't have employees whose job is to keep abreast of new requirements.

Owners also must comply with federal laws and regulations that can be seen as more burdensome than state and local requirements, in part because tax and health laws and rules affect every company, and labor laws create responsibilities for every employer. There are also thousands of federal regulations that individually affect smaller numbers of businesses, often because they govern specific industries, although the Trump administration has been eliminating or rewriting some of those rules.

Many companies, including American Rhino, turn to consultants and professionals to help ensure that they comply with rules, whether they're doing construction, running a retailer, restaurant or medical facility, employing people or just paying taxes. Consultants and pros like lawyers and accountants are continually on the lookout for changes in requirements; while many take effect Jan. 1 or July 1 in any given year, others can become effective on a less memorable date or may be immediately enforceable.

Technology consultant Larry Kovnat is hearing more from his small-business clients these days - they need to know about a new law aimed at protecting New York residents' private information from cybercriminals. The law, the Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act, known informally as the SHIELD Act, broadens the types of information to be protected and the types of data breaches that must be protected against. It makes anyone, a person or a business, that owns or licenses a New York resident's private information responsible for reporting a breach.

Data protection and privacy laws like the SHIELD Act, which starts taking effect March 21, and the California Consumer Privacy Act, which goes into effect Jan. 1, are becoming more common, creating more work even for companies outside the states where the laws are enacted.

"Any business is responsible for understanding the environment it operates in," says Kovnat, who works for the technology company iV4, based in Rochester, N.Y. "They might not have the expertise or resource to deal with this on their own."

Adam Calli has been telling new Washington, D.C., clients about the law taking effect in July that grants paid family leave to staffers; to comply, companies must pay taxes and file reports with the local government.

"Cities, states and counties are being more active" in requiring paid sick leave and family leave for workers, says Calli, founder of Arc Human Capital, a human resources consultancy based in Vienna, Va. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

State, Local Laws Might Present 'Twists and Turns'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.