Social Justice Education Requirements Cost College Students $10B per Year

By Patrick, John | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, December 11, 2019 | Go to article overview

Social Justice Education Requirements Cost College Students $10B per Year


Patrick, John, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


As many college graduates continue to struggle with their student loan debt, a new report reveals that mandatory social justice curriculum classes share some responsibility for rising college costs.

According to a report released by the National Association of Scholars, a conservative-leaning academic think tank, the growth of social justice on campus is adding serious costs. It has reached the point where it now costs students more than $10 billion dollars a year in tuition costs and university fees to finance social-justice-oriented educational programs and expenditures.

In their findings, the authors of the report detail how many university professors and administrators have infused social justice theory and ideals into their educational curriculum, which has led to the transformation of universities into training camps for progressive activism.

In conducting the analysis, lead study author David Randall noted that he identified the cost of two social justice courses at a public university in Arizona to be roughly $4,000, a conservative estimate, and applied it to the 2.2 million students nationwide who immediately enroll in college following high school graduation. These calculations produce an estimated cost of roughly $10 billion dollars just for social justice courses, a figure that is likely an underestimate, as private universities tend to charge much higher tuition prices than public universities.

Additionally, Randall noted that his report was merely an estimation of the costs related to implementation of social justice classes in academia and did not factor in the cost of universities employing social-justice administrators such as deans of diversity. …

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