The New Laws Set to Start in 2020

By Rodger, James | Birmingham Evening Mail (England), January 2, 2020 | Go to article overview

The New Laws Set to Start in 2020


Rodger, James, Birmingham Evening Mail (England)


THE RULES TAKE IN EVERYTHING FROM ORGAN DONATION TO OVERTAKING CYCLISTS, AS WELL AS CARS, PARENTAL LEAVE AFTER BEREAVEMENT AND MORE

A LIST of new laws are coming into effect this year - and they will impact everything from how you to drive to your time off work.

Every year, new legislation comes into effect, changing the way we live our lives - and the next 12 months will be no different.

In fact, 2020 will be a particularly busy one for new laws, rules and regulations, with Brexit coming and a new government in full effect.

The new laws take everything from organ donation to overtaking cyclists into account, as well as your cars, parental leave after a bereavement, and more.

These are some of the new laws set to change the way you live your life over the next 12 months.

KEIRA AND MAX'S LAW From 2020, adults in England will be considered potential donors unless they choose to opt out or are excluded.

A new system for organ donation that will save hundreds of lives has come into law, with the Organ Donation (Deemed Consent) Bill receiving Royal Assent in March. Royal Assent means the bill is now an act of parliament.

The Organ Donation Act will mean adults in England will be considered potential donors unless they chose to opt out or are excluded. The act is known as Max and Keira's law in honour of a boy who received a heart transplant and the girl who donated it.

There are more than 6,000 people currently waiting for an organ in the UK. Three people die each day while on the waiting list. The new law will help to reduce the number of people waiting for a life-saving transplant.

Changes to the way consent is granted will take effect in 2020. Before this happens, the government will launch a public awareness campaign to make sure people understand the new system and the choices they have.

DRIVING PERMITS AND GREEN CARDS FOR DRIVING IN EU When the UK leaves the European Union, many of us may require new licences. On January 14, 2019 the Government released new guidance informing Brits their current driving licenses will be useless on the continent in a no-deal scenario.

If you're planning to drive in the EU as a holidaymaker or visitor, you will have to spend £5.50 on an international permit if we leave without a deal. This will be available to purchase from Post Office or driving agencies like RAC and the AA.

You will need to carry a motor insurance green card when driving in the EU and EEA. Contact your insurance provider one month before you travel to obtain green cards for your vehicle, caravan or trailer.

DISPLAYING A GB STICKER UK motorists will need to display a GB sticker on their cars when driving in Ireland after Brexit.

New government advice says motorists from the UK will need the sticker in all EU countries after the UK's departure - even if their number plate has a GB logo. …

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