More Navy Vets Eligible for Agent Orange Compensation

By Jacobson, Ben | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), January 6, 2020 | Go to article overview

More Navy Vets Eligible for Agent Orange Compensation


Jacobson, Ben, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


BY BEN JACOBSON

Ben.jacobson@thmedia.com

Dick Bridges, then a member of the U.S. Air Force security police, recalled being stationed in Thailand as Agent Orange was frequently sprayed to defoliate the area.

The idea was to maintain a line of sight, making it easier to stay vigilant during a time of war. When the herbicide would start to wear off, "they sprayed it again," Bridges said.

More than 13 million gallons of Agent Orange were used during the Vietnam War. And decades after troops returned home, the effects still are being felt.

Bridges' two best friends from his time in the service died within the past 10 years from diseases linked to Agent Orange exposure.

"I have no symptoms or whatever," said Bridges, of Dubuque. "It can just come at some point in your life. ... It's hard to have something like this hanging over your head, never knowing if you're going to get it or not."

Now a new law is extending federal benefits to thousands more veterans who might have been exposed to the harmful chemical. The Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 went into effect on Jan. 1, hopefully extending vital financial and medical benefits to many who had long been excluded.

"They say it's going to be about 100,000 other Navy personnel who are going to be able to file claims," said Randy Rennison, executive director of the Dubuque County Veterans Affairs office.

The law, signed in June 2019, extends a presumption of herbicide exposure to "blue water" Navy veterans.

Rennison said those who served in "blue water" areas were off the coast when Agent Orange was used, but still likely were exposed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

More Navy Vets Eligible for Agent Orange Compensation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.