Column: Jay-Z Sells out Kaepernick, Grabs Big Money from NFL

Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), August 16, 2019 | Go to article overview

Column: Jay-Z Sells out Kaepernick, Grabs Big Money from NFL


Remember when Jay-Z was a dynamic hip-hop artist whose stark lyrics gave voice to the oppressed and downtrodden?

Well, those days are over.

He may have 99 Problems – but a conscience certainly ain’t one.

Completing his transformation to total sellout, Jay-Z climbed into bed with those racial progressives over at the NFL in what was clearly nothing more than a money grab for one side and a public-relations coup for the other.

Sorry, Kaep.

Social justice has been banished to the sidelines.

“I think we’ve moved past kneeling and I think it’s time to go into actionable items,” Jay-Z said in a ludicrously weak attempt to spin his hefty NFL payoff into some sort of profile in courage.

With a totally straight face – and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell by his side – the rap icon and entrepreneur said his partnership with the league is actually a progressive step to carry on the campaign that banished quarterback Colin Kaepernick courageously began by kneeling during the national anthem to bring attention to police brutality and glaring racial inequities in the U.S. justice system.

“I think everyone knows what the issue is – we’re done with that,” Jay-Z said. “We all know the issue now. OK, next.”

Hmm, where have we heard that before?

Oh, yeah, from opponents of the civil rights movement, who derided those protesting against whites-only lunch counters and seats in the back of the bus as nothing more than rabble-rousers who should’ve been focused on real issues afflicting the African American community, as if a system that denied pretty much every human dignity wasn’t the actual problem.

“Now that we all know what’s going on, what are we going to do?” Jay-Z said, putting his foot further in his mouth. “How are we going to stop it? Because the kneeling was not about a job, it was about injustice.”

Hey, maybe the NFL should take its deal with Roc Nation to a whole new level by pairing Jay-Z with Jon Voight, another celebrity (yes, kids, Jon Voight was once a cutting-edge actor) who turned in what little was left of his cred card after that awful film “Anaconda” by declaring recently that racism was “solved long ago by our forefathers.”

We can see the ad now:

“Welcome to another season of exciting NFL football! Featuring the social justice stylings of Jay-Z, who’ll show us all how to make a buck off police beating up black people.

And the racially harmonious world of Jon Voight, asking the question that’s been on everyone’s mind: Why can’t we all just get along? …

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