More Women Riding Their Own Motorcycles

Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), June 9, 2019 | Go to article overview

More Women Riding Their Own Motorcycles


CHEYENNE – Freedom. Control. Stress relief.

The reasons women offer for why they love to ride their own motorcycles are varied, but no matter the reason, more women are moving forward from the passenger seat to the driver’s seat.

“Riding a bike is so liberating,” said Cheyenne’s Natalie Young, a woman who owns and rides her own motorcycle. “It’s like flying.”

That freedom is stress relief for hair stylist Ralyn Barker of Cheyenne.

“My bike is named ‘The Therapist,’” she said. “It clears your head.”

For Ronnie Brubaker of Cheyenne, riding her own bike makes her feel like she is managing her own ride. She started riding as a passenger with a former boyfriend, but something was missing.

“I didn’t like the lack of control on the back,” Brubaker said. “I need my own.”

After she graduated with her registered nursing degree, she took the plunge.

“I took a motorcycle safety course, and for a graduation present, I bought myself a bike,” she said.

According to Cory Sellers, director of marketing and events for Cheyenne’s High Country Harley-Davidson, in the last decade, the industry has seen the percentage of female motorcycle owners rise from less than 10% to 19%. That number is even higher when broken down by age range. Millennial female riders – those born between 1981-1996 – make up 26% of bike owners in their age group.

“It really is an upward tick,” Sellers said. “Our own sales metrics show we have a lot of women coming in and buying their own motorcycles.”

With an eye on the increase in women bike owners, High Country Harley-Davidson’s service department is offering classes to women motorcycle riders. Called Girls and Gears, the classes aim to teach riders more about their machines.

“Girls and Gears is for women who already ride or are interested in learning to ride and learning about motorcycles,” Kiley Avery, event coordinator for High Country Harley-Davidson said in an email. “This is an event we have been pushing for a couple years now, and we are starting to get a great response, both in Colorado and Wyoming. There is no charge to attend, and we don’t care what kind of bike you ride or want to ride, as long as you want to experience the thrill of riding a motorcycle.”

Now women can also join an all-female social riding club in Cheyenne called the Steel Vixens. The group started in early May and is already more than 50 members strong. According to organizer Sheree Lange, they have members joining from Laramie, Casper, Lusk and Nebraska.

These members are working to promote female riders and give them a place to meet up with other women to ride. …

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