Names Found in El Tirador Estatestake Us on a Tour of Firearms History

By Leighton, David | AZ Daily Star, May 4, 2020 | Go to article overview

Names Found in El Tirador Estatestake Us on a Tour of Firearms History


Leighton, David, AZ Daily Star


In 1951, Pima County named an access road that led to the Marana Auxiliary Army Airfield No. 5 — built during World War II and now called El Tiro Gliderport — in Avra Valley.

They called it El Tiro Road (The Shot Road), and as a result several subdivisions bordering this road later on would be named in connection with it, such as El Tiro Estates (The Shot Estates), Hunter Subdivision and El Tirador Estates (The Shooter Estates).

Around 1970, Gene E. Anderson, a civil engineer and owner of Anderson Engineering, and his team had the task of coming up with street names for the new El Tirador Estates, a subdivision name they likely came up with themselves or with the help of the land owner.

According to his son Jeff Anderson, his father was an avid hunter and owned several firearms for this purpose, which may have contributed to the names chosen. All of the street names are connected with firearms.

Musket Road: A musket is a somewhat general term for a muzzle-loading (projectile loaded from the front of the barrel), long gun with a smoothbore barrel that is shot using the shoulder.

Later on when the barrels had rifling or grooves on the inside they were called rifled muskets.

One example of a musket in American history:

During the American Revolutionary War, French support of the colonists against the British was vital for victory. At the beginning of the war, the colonies had a shortage of firearms as a result of Britain’s gun control program, which included a 1774 import ban on firearms and gunpowder and a 1774-75 confiscation of firearms and gunpowder. The Intolerable Acts, along with the confiscation of weapons from colonists, contributed to the outbreak of hostilities between Britain and its colonies in 1775.

The following year, the Continental Congress created a secret committee to buy weapons from France, and two years after that when France declared war on Britain, it began shipping muskets directly to the 13 colonies. The musket in this case was the French Infantry Musket, M1728 (Charleville). A later model of this musket, the M1763, served as a model for the first American Springfield musket made in 1795.

Springfield Road: In 1777, Gen. George Washington, commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American War of Independence, ordered the Springfield Armory to be founded in Springfield, Massachusetts. The armory produced pistols, swords and ammunition as well as repaired weapons. It also stored weapons.

During the U.S. Civil War, the Springfield Armory supplied Union Army troops with muskets and, toward the end, rifles.

During World War I, the M1903 Springfield rifle was the standard issue firearm for American soldiers. The rifle was also used during World War II before being replaced by the M1 Garand semi-automatic rifle.

During the Second World War, the Springfield Armory employed more than 14,000 men and women to manufacture the M-1 Garand semi-automatic rifle, named for the man who created it, Springfield Armory engineer John Garand.

In 1968, Congress decided to close the Springfield Armory after almost 200 years. Following this, Elmer C. Balance of Texas registered the trademark of Springfield Armory for his company, which manufactured firearms. He sold the company to another family in 1974 and they now run the Springfield Armory, Inc. in Geneseo, Illinois. The original Springfield Armory is now a National Historic Site.

If the street is named for a particular model from the Springfield Armory it is likely the very popular M1903 Springfield, although it might just be named for Springfield firearms in general.

Carbine Road: A carbine is a fairly general term and while the roots of the word aren’t fully known, it is likely a modification of the French word “carabine,” meaning short rifle. Basically, a carbine is a long rifle that is shorter than a full-sized rifle.

Prior to the 1700s, carbines were mostly used by cavalry and soldiers not normally in direct combat. …

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