Sigma XI Will Showcase Art and Science Collaborations at Its Annual Meeting

American Scientist, May/June 2020 | Go to article overview

Sigma XI Will Showcase Art and Science Collaborations at Its Annual Meeting


Sigma Xi will highlight interdisciplinary collaborations, particularly those that connect art and science, in preparation for its Annual Meeting and Student Research Conference in November, where the theme will be Hacking the Brain: The Intersection of Art and Neuroscience.

From October to December 2019, Sigma Xi was part of As Above As Below, a collection of six multimedia and interactive exhibits in San Francisco created by teams of artists, astrophysicists, and neuroscientists. Each exhibit explored the parallels between galactic and neuronal networks. The collection was curated and produced by Esther Mallouh of Keen on Art.

Some of the collaborators sat on a panel discussion, moderated by Sigma Xi Executive Director and CEO Jamie Vernon, for the exhibit opening to discuss their projects and what it was like to work together.

"I think the bottom line of this is that artists and scientists are looking for creative solutions to innovate," said Forest Stearns, the creative innovation consultant and artist in residence founder at Google AI Quantum.

Joel Primack, Sigma Xi immediate past president and a distinguished professor of physics emeritus at the University of California, Santa Cruz, said he came away with a new perspective about his own research. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sigma XI Will Showcase Art and Science Collaborations at Its Annual Meeting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.