Teachers Don't Even Want to Teach Virtually — Taxpayers Should Revolt

By Lowe, Tiana | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, July 29, 2020 | Go to article overview

Teachers Don't Even Want to Teach Virtually — Taxpayers Should Revolt


Lowe, Tiana, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


First the teachers unions demanded that they not be asked to return to physical schools out of fears for their own safety. Now, it seems the teachers don't want to teach at all.

"[The Los Angeles teachers] union and administrators are engaged in long negotiating sessions via Zoom, with one of the stickiest points of contention being how many hours per day teachers should be required to teach live via video," the New York Times reports of teachers unions "weary of returning to class, and online instruction too."

"Cecily Myart-Cruz, president of the United Teachers Los Angeles union, said she understood the benefits — she watched her own son engage with teachers online during the spring shutdown — but she argued that a full school day over video would not be feasible for either students or teachers (although some private schools have embraced it)."

So, to be clear, not only do the teachers unions not want to do their actual jobs in person — they don't even want to spend more than the equivalent of a lunch break on Zoom. Yet they expect you, the taxpayer, to keep funding them.

Of all the pandemic pandemonium we've suffered in the last five months, public employees attempting to threaten the taxpayers into giving them a yearlong paid vacation, while our children suffer mental health and developmental delays and parents see their own livelihoods put in jeopardy might be the most infuriating.

When teachers were arguing that they felt unsafe returning to schools without a clear plan, there was at least some reason to be sympathetic to their position — even as many other essential workers remained in their jobs during the pandemic. But now that they are rebelling against even remote work, they no longer deserve the benefit of the doubt.

So it's time to call a spade a spade. This is not motivated by science. It's motivated by the same sort of flagrant self-interest that's allowed teachers unions to give a free ride to the underachievers of the public school system, while actual competent educators are denied merit-based pay. …

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