Editorial: The Census Is in Trouble. So Is Democracy

Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), September 3, 2020 | Go to article overview

Editorial: The Census Is in Trouble. So Is Democracy


If the 2020 census isn’t in a state of crisis, it is awfully close.

The coronavirus pandemic, of course, has made pretty much everything about contemporary life in America a lot more difficult. But the problems confronting the 2020 census also have a significant political component, from the Trump administration’s effort to scare off immigrant participation by adding a question about citizenship status, through the recent order to speed up the conclusion of the count – even though the agency had asked Congress in April to extend its reporting deadline because of pandemic-related delays.

Administration officials try to be reassuring in their public pronouncements about how well they are doing, but there isn’t much in which the public can have faith. More than a quarter of the households remain uncounted, and by definition, those are the folks hardest to reach. Then there are the unknown impacts from raging wildfires in California and elsewhere in the West, hurricanes in the Gulf states and whatever other natural calamities might unfold over the next month.

Census experts, including former directors, warn that undercounts are likely, and that the results of the constitutionally mandated tally may be too unreliable to be used for its prime purpose: reapportioning 435 seats in the House of Representatives among the states (California is projected to lose a seat for the first time in state history).

In fact, Kenneth Prewitt, who oversaw the 2000 census, told a conference this summer that the current count has endured more political interference “than any other census in our history,” and that it “has certainly led to a decline in the confidence in the Census Bureau.” As for the count itself, Prewitt said, “if the current situation holds, I do not expect a census of a quality that the Census Bureau will even want to release the data. ... We’re in for a brutal battle over the next two or three months.”

So what to do? If the critics’ worries prove out, and there are massive undercounts in immigrant-heavy and low-income areas, the ensuing reapportionment will likely tilt in favor of the Republicans who have pursued policies seemingly designed to, at a minimum, undermine the census takers. Remember, the push to add the citizenship question arose from a Republican political operative, Thomas B. Hofeller, who specialized in gerrymandering, and among Commerce Department officials who urged the Justice Department to ask for the question under the pretext that it was needed to enforce the Voting Rights Act. …

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