Lange: The Most Pro-Life National Convention in History

Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), September 4, 2020 | Go to article overview

Lange: The Most Pro-Life National Convention in History


Physician-assisted suicide, discrimination against children with Down syndrome, adoption, born-alive infant protection and abortion together form a cluster of policy debates called “life issues.” Pundits consider these as the “third rail” of politics, to be avoided whenever possible.

In recent years, however, that has changed. Extremists on the left shout out support for abortion up through the moment of birth. Yet, even in the face of this vocal challenge, party leaders on both sides of the aisle work to silence the pro-life side.

Last week, this pattern was broken when cancer survivor Natalie Harp told her story. She exposed how the regime of physician-assisted suicide poisons the medical profession.

“I was told I was a burden to my family and to my country, and that by choosing to die early, I’d actually be saving the lives of others by preserving resources for them, rather than wasting them on a lost cause like myself,” Harp recalled. This was the first time ever that a major party convention condemned physician-assisted suicide.

The following night, Abby Johnson came to the podium. She spoke of the day when, as director of a Texas Planned Parenthood clinic, she first witnessed the procedure that earned her salary.

“Nothing prepared me for what I saw on the screen, an unborn baby fighting back, desperate to move away from the suction,” she recalled. “And I’ll never forget what the doctor said next: ‘Beam me up, Scotty.’ The last thing I saw was a spine twirling around in the mother’s womb before succumbing to the force of the suction.”

Words such as these had never before been spoken at a convention of either party. They broke through all the abstract euphemisms meant to hide the reality of abortion. “You see, for me, abortion is real. I know what it sounds like. I know what abortion smells like. Did you know abortion even had a smell?”

That final sentence resounded like a rifle shot. She was followed immediately by Nick Sandmann, the teenager who found himself in the crosshairs of the world’s most powerful media outlets. After participating in Washington’s March for Life, he was accosted by a professional agitator, targeted for his red MAGA hat.

This incident was then flipped on its head by irresponsible pundits. “The full war machine of the mainstream media revved up into attack mode,” he said. “They did so without researching the full video of the incident, without ever investigating Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Lange: The Most Pro-Life National Convention in History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.