Former U of W Prof Writing Book on Evangelicalism

By Longhurst, John | Winnipeg Free Press, September 19, 2020 | Go to article overview

Former U of W Prof Writing Book on Evangelicalism


Longhurst, John, Winnipeg Free Press


Ever since the 2016 U.S. presidential election, there has been a lot of focus on evangelical Christians in that country. Specifically, why so many of them voted for Donald Trump — and why they continue to support him.

That support has prompted some evangelicals in other countries to put distance between themselves and their American co-religionists, and to try to define what evangelicalism means in their own nations.

One of the leading voices for that in Canada is John Stackhouse, a professor of religious studies at New Brunswick’s Crandall University.

Stackhouse, who formerly taught at the University of Winnipeg, is writing a book on evangelicalism — what it is, what it isn’t, and how it is different from what we see in the U.S. — for Oxford University Press. Before it comes out next year, I asked him a few questions about the book and the state of evangelicalism today.

John Longhurst: What prompted you to want to write this book?

John Stackhouse: Evangelicalism is widely recognized but not widely understood. There are lots of simplistic versions of it, from critics who think it means just “fundamentalism” or “Trump supporters” to people who think it means just “true Christianity.”

So because I have been a historian of evangelicalism, a theologian within evangelicalism, and a journalist on behalf of evangelicalism, I thought I could help a wide audience see evangelicalism as the richly interesting style of Christianity it has been for almost 300 years.

JL: What will the book cover?

JS: I’ll cover the history of evangelicalism from its European and American origins to its current status as the world’s fastest-growing form of religion. I will also, however, take considerable time to define it: to sort out what it is and what it isn’t.

I’ll be careful to discuss not just its main convictions, but also its defining characteristics. Evangelicalism is not only doctrinally orthodox about Jesus and the Bible, but it is also a deeply populist and sometimes ruthlessly pragmatic form of religion. It is fundamentally a “heart” religion, but it has strong convictions about one’s “head” and “hands” as well.

JL: What do you see as the future of evangelicalism in Canada and the U.S.?

JS: For the short term, evangelicals in Canada are going to continue to just get along, make a few converts, work hard to retain the allegiance of their young people (which they do better than almost anyone else), stay out of trouble and do some good for their neighbours here and abroad.

In the U.S., let’s see how the presidential election goes. Black evangelicals, like Black people in general, have been energized as well as saddened and infuriated by the recent spate of high-profile killings. White evangelicals have been told that “reconciliation,” their favourite word for relating to Black Christians, might just have to wait until justice is actually significantly increased. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Former U of W Prof Writing Book on Evangelicalism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.