Organisational Communication: Types of Communication Used by the Methodist Church and the Church of the Nazarene to Spread the Teachings of Jesus Christ

By Reddy, Mike Megrove | Gender & Behaviour, January 1, 2019 | Go to article overview

Organisational Communication: Types of Communication Used by the Methodist Church and the Church of the Nazarene to Spread the Teachings of Jesus Christ


Reddy, Mike Megrove, Gender & Behaviour


1. Introduction

This paper looks into two major Christian organisations which are currently in existence today, namely the Methodist church and the Church of the Nazarene. This paper looks to explore the types of communication these two Christian groups used during their movement stage and the types of communication they used when they became an organisation, and finally the types of communication they are using currently to spread the teachings of Jesus Christ.

2. The Aim

To identify the various types of communication these two Christian organisations used to spread the teachings of Jesus Christ throughout the world.

3. Theoretical Framework

The Shannon and Weaver Model of Communication is the theoretical framework which will be used.

Taken from Mishra (2017, n.p.)

In looking at the diagram above we are able to identify certain key areas that make up this model. They are the information source, transmitter, receiver, destination, noise, and feedback. The sender of the information is the information source and message which he/she sends to the receiver and is done via a medium. It can be through the radio, television, books, magazines, social media and the Internet. When there is any distortion which takes place during the communication process, it is referred to as noise, or as a researcher will prefer to call barrier. Noise is not the only barrier which affects the communication process. There are many other hindrances which can affect the communication process. Only when feedback is received from the receiver then only will the sender be aware if the original message which was sent was fully comprehended by the receiver. Similarly, among Christian groups during their interaction with others they will have those who will be senders, receivers, messages, medium used and at times even have barriers which hinder the communication process and finally also require feedback from those they are interacting with.

4.Literature Review

4.1.The Methodist Church

In the eighteen century John Wesley, George Whitefield and Charles Wesley were part of a society which was within the Church of England. This was where Methodism started. These preachers focused on bible study, however, they had a very methodical approach when it came to the scriptures. They were called Methodists because of the methodical religious stance and Christian conduct.

4.1.1.Charles (1707-1788) and John Wesley (1703-1791)

Charles Wesley (1707-1788) and John Wesley (1703-1791) are acknowledged as the founders of Methodism. Samuel Wesley their father was the rector of Epworth, Lincolnshire. In 1720 John Wesley went to Christ Church College. In 1725 John Wesley became an ordained deacon and in 1728 became an ordained priest in the Episcopal Church of England. However, in 1929 he returned to Oxford, and it was there that he became the leader of a Christians group who were called the Holy Club and the Methodist. They were called Methodist because of their methodical religious habits and the way they conducted their lives. The club members visited prisoners in Oxford jail so that they could propagate the Christian beliefs. In 1735 both Charles and John sailed to Georgia, in America after heading to an invitation by Governor Oglethorpe to come as missionaries to propagate the teachings of the Christian church. The Wesley's trip to America was not as successful. The Wesley's rejected the theology of Calvin, which focuses on predestination. They were Arminianistic and it was their firm stand that led to them parting with George Whitefield. The Methodist church established themselves in Wales in 1739, Ireland in 1747 and Scotland in 1751. In 1744 the Methodist workers held their first conference. John Wesley was a gifted speaker who had the ability to speak many languages. Among these languages which he preached in, were German, French, Italian and English. Anglican churches closed off their pulpits from John Wesley. …

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