Two Gentle Men: The Lives of George Herbert and Robert Herrick

By Marchette Chute | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE

KING JAMES DIED IN A MONTH OF EVIL WEATHER -- SNOW AND rain and hail and high winds -- and if the new king had been a superstitious man he might have taken it as a portent. But Charles ascended the throne placidly and told John Williams, his reluctant Lord Keeper, to summon a new Parliament. He needed money for his army and navy, and since Parliament had voted for war they would surely vote the money too.

Again there was a battle for seats. Sir Henry Wotton, who was a friend of Herbert's, tried to get elected for Canterbury and "spent almost fifty pound in good drink upon his followers," only to be defeated by one Captain Fisher. But he successfully ran for Sandwich, and in general it was the same men who served in James' last Parliament who returned to serve in the first of Charles'. Among them was George Herbert, who again represented the town of Montgomery.

George Herbert's second Parliament, like his first, had a delayed opening, this time caused by the coming of the plague. Parliament was scheduled to meet in the middle of May, 1625, but there was so much sickness in London that it was a question whether it was safe to meet there at all. But Charles could not wait indefinitely, and on the eighteenth of June he told his assembled Lords and Commons that he needed money to carry on the war they had recommended. Unlike his father, Charles was no orator and left most of the speechmaking to Williams, but his intent was clear enough.

The intention of the House of Commons was equally clear: no reforms, no money. They had grown to power under a tactful Elizabeth and a lazy James, and the lawyers and country gentlemen who made up the bulk of the House had a potential strength

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Two Gentle Men: The Lives of George Herbert and Robert Herrick
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Part One - George Herbert 9
  • Chapter One 11
  • Chapter Two 22
  • Chapter Three 35
  • Chapter Four 47
  • Chapter Five 57
  • Chapter Six 68
  • Chapter Seven 77
  • Chapter Eight 85
  • Chapter Nine 93
  • Chapter Ten 107
  • Chapter Eleven 116
  • Chapter Twelve 123
  • Chapter Thirteen 134
  • Chapter Fourteen 148
  • Part Two - Robert Herrick 153
  • Chapter Fifteen 155
  • Chapter Sixteen 161
  • Chapter Seventeen 170
  • Chapter Eighteen 178
  • Chapter Nineteen 184
  • Chapter Twenty 192
  • Chapter Twenty-One 203
  • Chapter Twenty-Two 211
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 219
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 226
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 235
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 244
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 255
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 265
  • Appendix - Walton's Biography of Herbert 277
  • Selected Bibliography 283
  • Index 299
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